Resident Ruth Marshall Presented with Proclamation from State

State Representative Jay Barrows presents proclamation Resident Ruth Marshall.

State Representative Jay Barrows presents proclamation to Resident Ruth Marshall.

Massachusetts State Representative Jay Barrows of the 1st Bristol District stopped by The Doolittle Home on Friday, July 11, 2014 to present Resident Ruth Marshall with a Proclamation from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in recognition of Ruth’s 100th birthday.

Ruth came to The Doolittle Home in October. Born in 1914 near Forest Hills, MA (Forest Hills area of Jamaica Plain), Ruth lived in Roslindale until the age of 6. After that, she and her family moved to Norwood, MA. Ruth attended Framingham State Teachers College, now Framingham State University, studying home economics. Ruth then moved to New Hampshire, where she met her husband George.

Ruth taught junior and senior high school students in New Hampshire as well as in New York State. Additionally, Ruth’s passion for books and libraries led her to become a librarian at the St. Johnsbury School, a well-recognized school in Northern Vermont. “I had a wonderful time as a librarian,” Ruth smiled.

Ruth was married to George for 57 years and raised 3 sons Gene, Kerry and Dennis. George was a registered pharmacist who was well-respected in his town. When asked her impression of the home, Ruth replied, “The Doolittle Home is safe. The staff is kind, thoughtful and pleasant for those who live here.”

Ruth is still an avid reader and can be seen crossing the street between The Doolittle Home and the Boyden Library often. She also enjoys jigsaw puzzles and games of Scrabble and has a couple of young Foxboro residents that come to the home just to play Scrabble with Ruth.

 

 

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Living with Chronic Pain

Assisted bowling with physical therapist Margie Howard and Resident Ebba is a great activity to monitor balance and mobility challenges.

Assisted bowling with physical therapist Margie Howard and Resident Ebba is a great activity to monitor balance and mobility challenges.

An invisible illness is defined as a physical or psychological medical condition that is not readily apparent. There are a wide variety of invisible illnesses and accompanying disabilities. Over 96% of chronic medical conditions do not show outward signs of their illness. A common invisible illness among older adults is chronic pain. Chronic pain is difficult to diagnose and treat due to varying definitions of pain and a lack of consensus in the medical field on treatment approaches. Chronic pain management is essential for older adults, particularly in light of findings demonstrating a connection between pain and falls.

Chronic pain is a major risk factor for falls in older people. Yet, chronic pain is often mismanaged by medical personnel due to lack of consistent guidelines for practitioners. Given the complexity of how chronic pain is managed, it is that much more important for individuals to take it upon themselves to seek information and guidance. Approaches to chronic pain management often include pharmacological, interventional, and psychological. Services are typically integrated into a comprehensive treatment plan that addresses both the physical and the psychological responses that accompany chronic pain.

Chronic pain symptoms may ebb and flow throughout a lifetime. There may be months or even years where symptoms are minimal or nonexistent. If you are experiencing chronic pain symptoms, a visit to a doctor specializing in sports medicine or physiatry could be helpful. Adjunctive medical treatment with a psychiatrist or psychologist may also be necessary.

The Doolittle Home has 24/7 licensed nursing care available to all residents. Keeping everyone safe from falls and following medication management guidelines are keys to comfortable living. Assisted bowling provides exercise for muscle groups as well as a little competitive fun.

Call Virginia for a personal tour at 508-543-2694 or email virginia@doolittle-home.org

References

www.nursingtimes.net/nursing-practice/clinical-zones/pain-management/managing-chronic-pain-in-older-people/5061660.article

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Trouble Staying Focused?

Resident Ebba, shows off a greeting card she made during the monthly card making activity.

Resident Ebba, shows off a greeting card she made during the monthly card making activity.

Concentration and attention are two of our most valuable qualities. They keep us focused in conversation, during work, and even during play. Unfortunately, concentration becomes more difficult as we age. However, scientists are not quite sure why concentration declines with age. It might be due to changes in brain activity and shifts in the brain’s frontal lobe. A research study at the Rotman Institute at Baycrest and the University of Toronto compared brain functioning in young, middle-aged, and older adults. Their findings confirm previous hypotheses. Concentration ability declines with age, particularly memory tasks.

Learn how to support an older adult in staying sharp as they age. If an older adult you know is working on a task that requires concentration, you can be helpful in facilitating their attention. Turn off all electronics. Beeping, buzzing, and ringing will certainly break someone’s concentration. If your older adult parent or friend is on a roll, working away for over 90 minutes, encourage him/her to take a break. Research demonstrates that 90 minutes is the perfect amount of time to remain productive in a state of high concentration. After 90 minutes, it’s important to take a short break away from the activity. Preferably, take time to do something physically active. Even if you stand-up from the computer, Sudoku, or crossword puzzle for only 10 minutes and do some light stretching, the important part is that you’re up and about. Before you begin an exercise routine make sure you check with your doctor.

The Doolittle Home’s approach to memory issues is unique. As a boutique retirement community, we are dedicated to individualized care. Our loyal and committed staff forms relationships with every resident and is sensitive to each resident’s particular memory level. Sometimes it is simple reassurance or assistance with the day of the week, a mealtime reminder or encouragement to join a group activity. We do not require all residents with memory limitations to live in a locked location of the home. We believe that keeping a person socially engaged and intellectually stimulated under supervision is the best response to loss of memory.

References

The Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest and the University of Toronto, reported in the February 2006 issue of the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 18, No. 2.

 

 

 

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Tom Madden Stops by The Doolittle to Entertain

Tom Madden asking resident Eileen to dance.

Tom Madden asking resident Eileen to dance.

Tom Madden, a local entertainer, stopped by The Doolittle on May 15th to the delight of our residents. Tom’s repetoire was varied with songs spanning decades, from Frank Sinatra to Jimmy Buffet and even Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky” for the staff. Tom was an expert at engaging his audience and had many residents in stitches with his jokes and his moves on the carpet. Tom quickly learned many of the residents’ names and inserted them into various songs, making everyone chuckle. Feet were tapping, hands were clapping and we even had a chorus of voices for a few of the songs.

Tom donated his time to introduce himself to The Doolittle. He plays several nights a week at Benjamin’s in Taunton as a solo performer and with his band. The home is very lucky to have Roz Champagne as our Activities Director for many years. Roz books fabulous entertainment and has many volunteers assist with activities every week.

If you have a talent or would like to volunteer your time at The Doolittle, please contact Roz at 508-543-2694.

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Healthy Eating in Older Adulthood

IMG_0259Nutritional needs change across the lifespan. Although overall calorie intake tends to decrease as we age, the requirements for micro-nutrients (vitamins and minerals) increase as we age. Vitamin D and calcium are two important micro-nutrients for older adults. Older adults also require additional dietary antioxidants, such as vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin B, and folate. Unfortunately, vitamin nutrient deficiencies are common among older adults due to diet plans that lack appropriate nutrition content. Therefore, it is essential that older adults make choices at mealtime that include nutrient-rich foods as well as a multivitamin.

Modifying your eating behaviors and diet is a quick and easy way to increase your vitamin intake. First, determine an appropriate vitamin supplement with your doctor. Two, evaluate your diet and identify areas that can be modified to include healthier food options. Three, include dark green vegetables such as spinach and broccoli to lunch and dinner. If you’re unsure how to incorporate healthy food in a way that satisfies your cravings, check out local cooking channels or purchase a cookbook from your nearest bookstore.

Micro-nutrient deficiencies in older adults can be explained by a constellation of factors, including but not limited to poor nutritional intake and normal physiological changes that accompany the aging process. Vitamins are essential to several bodily functions. One of the most important roles of vitamins for the body is antioxidant. Antioxidants are essential for energy production, a common deficiency for older adults. If you or a loved one are nutrient deficient or believe you might be, it is important to contact your doctor or a local dietician.

The Doolittle Home’s dietary staff, led by Food Service Supervisor Lori DiTomaso, prepares delicious meals in coordination with our dietician’s recommendations for each resident. Meal time is also a social time, with all residents eating their meals together in the dining room and rotating tables bi-monthly to ensure new stories and conversations.

LoriLori has been cooking at the Doolittle Home for 20 years. She was quick to explain that it “feels more like a family than a job.” Lori enjoys getting to know each of the residents and she enjoys watching the young dining room staff interact with the residents. It is good for both the high school students and the residents. Compared to other facilities she has worked in, it is unique to have personal relationships with each student. Lori feels that “all staff truly care about the residents and the home. They are not just doing their job.” This leads to staff longevity which enables the residents to know the staff they interact with each day. Contrary to what some might believe, Lori explains that her cooking at the Home is quite varied. She reviews menus with the residents on a bi-monthly basis and incorporates their suggestions for new dishes. She also explained how individual needs are addressed to ensure the dining experience is positive for each resident. For those who may have difficulty cutting their meat, it is cut for them in the kitchen and served cut up so they can enjoy their meal without feeling embarrassed to ask for assistance or to struggle on their own.

References

http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/fw08/olderadults.html

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How to Plan (Rather than React) to Retirement Living

Our residents have their cholesterol and other health needs monitored by the nursing staff.

Our residents have their cholesterol and other health needs monitored by the nursing staff.

Planning to move into a retirement home can be an empowering experience for individuals and families. It can also be overwhelming and scary at times. As life expectancy increases, more people will need a safe place to live after retirement. Instead of reacting to retirement at the eleventh hour, take preemptive steps and plan for your next phase. Read below for a few easy tips on how to choose your own destiny and plan for your future.

As you approach retirement, there are some basic questions to discuss with your family. What level of care do you need to thrive? When answering this question, consider your and your partner’s health needs, identifying the level of care that is most appropriate to maintain your quality of life. What geographical location is most appropriate for your lifestyle and health needs. Some older adults want to live near family or in place where the climate is warm. There are retirement homes in all parts of the country. The key is finding one that addresses your and your family’s needs and preferences. How much money are you able to spend on housing? Finances can be complicated, particularly if you have multiple responsibilities. Consult with a financial planner who has expertise in retirement planning for older adults.

Many older adults utilize a care coordinator to assist them in finding appropriate housing that accounts for lifestyle preferences, health needs, and financial constraints. Elder attorneys are also an available resource for older adults and their families.

The Doolittle Home invites older adults and their families to come for a tour of our facility, ask questions, learn about entry options and understand the services that are available under our roof. Call Virginia today to schedule a tour at 508-543-2694. It is never too early to plan ahead!!

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How to Keep Your Mind Sharp

Card making with Elizabeth is a favorite activity every month.

Card making with Elizabeth is a favorite activity every month.

Memory loss is common at all phases of the lifespan. Older adults, however, are disproportionally impacted by memory loss. While some memory loss is normal for older adults, severe forms of memory loss may signal a more serious medical concern, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. Simple memory loss may be preventable.  Read below to learn how to strengthen your memory one small step at a time.

First, read for pleasure on a daily basis. If you’re unable to read, inquire about volunteers to read aloud to you. Or, you can purchase audiobooks or rent them from your local library. Second, adopt a hobby that will help strengthen your memory. Word games, crosswords, and puzzles are examples of games that are fun and also challenging. These games are also appropriate to play with grandchildren during a visit or with peers when socializing.  Lastly, exercise has been shown to help both with overall health and also memory. Completing an exercise regimen should become a crucial part of your everyday routine. If you spend most of the day sitting, consider joining a walking group with other seniors. Working toward a fitness goal with peers can assist in holding you accountable to your health goals as well as to provide an opportunity for socializing.

If you’re concerned about your or a loved one’s loss of memory, visit a primary care doctor or neurologist as soon as possible. When you visit the doctor, come equipped with specific questions and concerns. Appointments with medical doctors are often short; therefore, the more prepared you are the better.

The Doolittle Home’s approach to memory care is unique as we do not have locked units or require all residents with memory limitations to live in the same location of the home. We believe that keeping an elderly person socially engaged and intellectually stimulated under supervision is the best response to loss of memory.

As a boutique retirement community, we are dedicated to individualized care. Our loyal and committed staff forms relationships with every resident and is sensitive to each resident’s particular memory level. Sometimes it is simple reassurance or assistance with dressing, the day of the week, mealtime reminder or encouragement to join a group activity.

We invite you to come see our wonderful facility and meet our staff to learn how we engage all of our residents to enhance their lives. Call Virginia at 508-543-264 for a tour today!

References

www.apa.org/pi/aging/memory-and-aging.pdf

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Charity Art Auction Brings Community Together for a Fun Evening

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The Doolittle Home Charity Art Auction was a fun-filled evening bringing together generous members of the community on March 15th. The evening began with Executive Director, DeAnna Willis thanking all in attendance and introducing our esteemed auctioneers, Bill Grieder and Kevin Weinfeld. The two entertained the crowd with jokes and commentary on the 55 donated pieces of artwork, often encouraging bidding wars between families. It was all in good fun and for a good cause, the residents of The Doolittle Home in our unique Life Care Program.

The auction brought in over $16,000 in donations, including a $1,000 donation from the Foxboro Rotary Club in advance of the event.

The event was made possible by the generous and talented members and friends of the Foxboro Art Association who donated all of the artwork for the live auction. Every piece was purchased during the evening, demonstrating the appeal of the diverse selections to the crowd. In addition, 12 Homer White paintings were sold in a silent auction that took on a life of its own, with some “collectors” outbidding one another at the last minute.

“The Doolittle Home is delighted with the outpouring of support and generosity by the community,” said Virginia Lehr, Director of Marketing and Communications for The Doolittle Home. “We plan to hold more events to showcase the partnership of The Doolittle Home and the wonderful people of Foxboro and surrounding towns.”

The Doolittle Home is a century-old retirement home dedicated to compassionate elder care. A unique facility, located in downtown Foxboro, the home is recognized as a 501 (C)3 public charity by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The Doolittle Home is open to men, women, and couples regardless of race, religion, or national origin. One hundred percent of your tax-deductible donation will enhance the lives of our elderly residents everyday.

For more information on how you can donate to our non-profit organization and learn more about the unique model of our Life Care Program, please contact Virginia Lehr at 508-543-2694 or virginia@doolittle-home.org.

 

 

 

 

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THE DOOLITTLE HOME TO AUCTION OVER $15,000 IN ARTWORK

Oriental Treasures by Barbara McAuliffe, pastel, valued at $1200.

Oriental Treasures by Barbara McAuliffe, pastel, valued at $1200.

The Doolittle Home will auction 55 individual pieces of artwork at its live Charity Art Auction on Saturday, March 15 at the Foxboro Country Club. Members and friends of the Foxboro Art Association have generously donated outstanding works of art valued at over $15,000.

All artwork can be viewed at the Boyden Library through March 14. The artwork will be displayed at the event for last-minute viewing prior to the start of the auction. There are pieces for every décor and price range, with local subjects such as Gillette Stadium, the Foxboro Common and Nantucket Harbor. The collection includes a variety of mediums, from watercolor to photography, oil to pen and ink.

The evening will include a live auction of the artwork by Foxboro residents Kevin Weinfeld and Bill Grieder. Additionally, a special silent auction of non-traditional Homer White paintings will be featured. Music and appetizers are included in the ticket price and there will be a cash bar. The event begins at 7:00 pm.

Tickets are $25 per person in advance and $30 at the door. To purchase tickets, please contact Virginia at 508-543-2694 or email your request to virginia@doolittle-home.org. All credit cards are accepted.

The Doolittle Home is a century-old retirement home dedicated to compassionate elder care. A unique facility, located in downtown Foxboro, the home is recognized as a 501 (C)(3) public charity by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The Doolittle Home is open to men, women, and couples regardless of race, religion, or national origin. One hundred percent of your tax-deductible donation will enhance the lives of our elderly residents everyday.

Founded in 1957, the Foxboro Art Association is a non-profit support group that has been part of the local art scene for half a century. The association has more than one hundred members in over twenty surrounding towns.

To watch Foxborough Central’s program showcasing the organizations and the event, please click here.

 

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February is American Heart Month!

american-heart-monthA healthy heart is a key component to maintaining a healthy body. Older adults are particularly prone to cardiovascular disease, with over 42.2 million older adults having one or more cardiovascular diseases. The average annual rates of cardiovascular disease rise approximately 71% from middle to older adulthood. The vast majority of cardiovascular related deaths occur in people ages 75 and older.

The American Heart Association recommends that older adults should have an ankle-brachial index test every one to two years. The purpose of the test is to identify whether plaque has built between the leg arteries, a less common cardiovascular disease. Watching your weight is another key to managing cardiovascular disease and preventing its onset. Integrating gentle exercise into your daily routine is also integral for maintaining a healthy heart. Older adults should also learn about the warning signs of cardiovascular disease, particularly those associated with heart attack and stroke. If you are caring for an older adult, seek resources to educate yourself and your loved one on risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Changing your daily routine can be difficult if taken on all at once. Aim to make one small change a day.  Particularly if you’re concerned about cardiovascular disease, focus on changing your diet and incorporating exercise. If you smoke, seek help to reduce your nicotine intake. The staggering statistics about cardiovascular disease emphasize the importance of older adults taking preventative measures to ensure the health of their heart.

The Doolittle Home works with our residents individually to ensure that their hearth health is constantly monitored. Through daily checking of vital signs, regular physician visits,  a healthy diet, medicine management and activities for the mind and body, residents of The Doolittle Home enjoy a long and healthy retirement.

Meet Christine Kent, Director of Nursing Services

Christine KentChristine came to Doolittle Home in 1997. A graduate of St. Elizabeth School of Nursing, Christine began her Doolittle Home career as a night shift nurse. Christine has been Director since 2005, and oversees a staff of 25 nurses, CNAs, as well as the Physical Therapist, Medical Director, Dietician, Social Worker, and Pharmacy Consultant. Christine says, “Working at Doolittle Home is like working with family. We all work together as a team to get the job done. What each of us brings to the residents, makes the difference.”

For more information on The Doolittle Home or to schedule a tour, call Virginia at 508-5443-2694 or click here.

 

References

http://www.heart.org/idc/groups/heart-public/@wcm/@sop/@smd/documents/downloadable/ucm_319574.pdf

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/MyHeartandStrokeNews/Preventing-Heart-Disease—At-Any-Age_UCM_442925_Article.jsp

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The Doolittle Home Announces Date of Charity Art Auction

Paint-SplatterThe Doolittle Home is pleased to announce that we will be holding a Charity Art Auction on Saturday, March 15 at the Foxboro Country Club. Members and friends of the Foxboro Art Association have generously donated their best works of art for this benefit auction.

Beginning February 1st through the date of the event, all artwork can be viewed at the Boyden Library in downtown Foxboro. In addition, a program with photos of each piece of artwork, the artist name and a value will be distributed upon arrival to the event. The artwork will be displayed at the event for last-minute viewing prior to the start of the auction.

The evening will include a live auction of the artwork by Foxboro residents Kevin Weinfeld and Bill Grieder. Additionally, a special silent auction of non-traditional Homer White paintings will be featured. Music and appetizers are included in the ticket price and there will be a cash bar.

Tickets are $25 per person in advance, $30 at the door, though tickets are limited due to space restrictions. It is recommended to purchase tickets early to ensure admittance to the event.

Advertising is available in the program in a variety of sizes, including family and friends listings, business card sections and full and half pages.

The Doolittle Home is a century-old retirement home dedicated to compassionate elder care. A unique facility, located in downtown Foxboro, the home is recognized as a 501 (C)(3) public charity by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The Doolittle Home is open to men, women, and couples regardless of race, religion, or national origin. One hundred percent of your tax-deductible donation will enhance the lives of our elderly residents everyday.

Founded in 1957, the Foxboro Art Association is a non-profit support group that has been part of the local art scene for half a century. The association has more than one hundred members in over twenty surrounding towns.

To purchase tickets or advertising, please contact Virginia at 508-543-2694 or virginia@doolittle-home.org

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High Cholesterol: It’s Bad for Your Health

Our residents have their cholesterol and other health needs monitored by the nursing staff.

Our residents have their cholesterol and other health needs monitored by the nursing staff.

High cholesterol is not something with which we are born. Rather, it is something that develops over time as a result of the choices we make around food. Our body reacts to our nutrition and dietary decisions, which might result in high cholesterol.

Surprisingly, only one-fourth of blood cholesterol is ingested from our diet. The majority of the cholesterol in our bodies is produced in the liver. Our bodies require some cholesterol and it is an important part of our composition. Often, though, older adults have too much cholesterol, which can be problematic in maintaining a healthy body. An excess of cholesterol builds as plaque in the arteries, which slows the flow of blood throughout our system. Unfortunately, buildup often occurs in the coronary arteries, which prevents blood from getting to the heart. Clogging of the arteries can lead to heart disease, which is a serious long-term consequence of high cholesterol.

According to Web MD, there are several ways to reduce cholesterol. First, you must set a target. If you’re caring for an older adult, have a conversation with him/her and discuss the target cholesterol number. It’s important that the conversation is collaborative. Older adults should feel accountable to their own heath, even if they are receiving support from people who love them. Avoiding saturated fats, increasing fiber, and other nutritional changes are essential. Also, increasing physical activity is key. If physical activity is difficult, find other ways to stay active like lifting weights or using a stationary exercise bicycle.

Meet Lori DiTomaso, Food Service Supervisor
Lori has been cooking at the Doolittle Home for 20 years, but first heard about it from her father who serviced the piano at the home. She was quick to explain that it “feels more like a family than a job.” Lori enjoys getting to know each of the residents and she enjoys watching the young dining room staff interact with the residents. It is good for both the high school students and the residents. Compared to other facilities she has worked in, it is unique to have personal relationships with each student. Lori feels that “all staff truly care about the residents and the home. They are not just doing their job.” This leads to staff longevity which enables the residents to know the staff they interact with each day. Contrary to what some might believe, Lori explains that her cooking at the home is quite varied. She reviews menus with the residents on a bi-monthly basis and incorporates their suggestions for new dishes. She also explained how individual needs are addressed to ensure the dining experience is positive for each resident. For those who may have difficulty cutting their meat, it is cut for them in the kitchen and served cut up so they can enjoy their meal without feeling embarrassed to ask for assistance or to struggle on their own.

For more information about The Doolittle Home or to schedule a tour, please call us at 508-543-2694 or click here to visit our website.

References
http://www.aplaceformom.com/senior-care-resources/articles/cholesterol-in-seniors

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Staying Connected

Residents Ruth (left) and Ebba enjoy each others company in the sun room.

Staying connected and engaged with others is an important part of growing older. Not only is this important for older adults’ psychological and emotional well being but also it is important for their physical health. Older adults who socialize with friends and stay connected to family members are in better physical health than those who report social isolation. Sometimes older adulthood can be a lonely time, leaving people feeling sad and depressed. If you’re a senior, read below for a few ideas on how to stay engaged as you age.

If you’re home bound and don’t have many visitors, consider adopting a pet. There are many shelters where you can take a pet home for free. Surely, you will feel the benefits of being a pet owner every day. If you want to learn about the joys of being a pet owner, contact your local animal shelter. They will have all of the necessary information about the steps to becoming a pet owner. They might even allow you to call recent customers who have adopted pets and learn about their experiences.

Some ways to connect with people are through jobs, volunteer opportunities, and continuing education. Part-time jobs and volunteer opportunities are available in most towns and all cities. Many older adults seek out work with children or the elderly. Opportunities can include reading aloud to hospital patients, accompanying children/seniors on outings, and facilitating games with children. If working and volunteering are not up your alley, consider continuing your education. Local colleges and adult enrichment programs often offer courses in creative writing, literature, woodworking, knitting, and others that are open to the public.

Local senior centers or coalition on aging councils are a great way to get out of the house and meet others. Many towns and cities have senior centers, some even with transportation available, so that older adults can come together, play games, exercise, eat lunch, attend information sessions on health and more. The directors of these centers are often well-versed in outreach programs for seniors and keep their center bustling with engaging activities.

At Doolittle Home, there is an activity to engage the residents everyday, thanks to Roz Champagne, Activities Director.

Stan with Roz, Doolittle Home's Activities Director

Roz is adored by the residents. Starting as a volunteer in 2001 before being employed as a Dietary Aide for Doolittle Home, a natural fit was realized when the Director of Activities position became open in January 2004. Roz spends the morning in the nursing unit, followed by various activities, such as a morning stretch program, music appreciation, puzzles, games, poetry, and current events. In the afternoon, Roz can be found in the main house, entertaining the residents with bingo, spelling bees, trivia, amongst other enjoyable activities. Roz books all the entertainment for Doolittle Home with visitors ranging from Crossroads Children Center singing their little hearts out for residents to various community groups and musicians. Doolittle Home’s van provides transportation for trips within the region for out of the home services, such as doctor and dentist appointments, local shopping, and trips to Norton Public Library. Roz is coordinator of Doolittle Home’s volunteer program. Volunteer activities include therapy dog visits, a woman’s discussion group, poetry hour, card making and crafts, as well as a one-on-one program, where volunteers are paired with residents. On Wednesdays each week, bowling is a featured activity, with the mornings focusing on competition and afternoons featuring an assisted bowling program designed for those needing extra care from Doolittle Home’s physical therapist, Marge Howard. Roz is a native North Attleboro resident with 8 children, 14 grandchildren, 2 great grandchildren and one very tired husband. Roz always brings her sense of humor and passion for helping others

 

 

 

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Santa’s Helpers Deliver Gifts on Christmas Eve

Allyson, Riley(back row left to right) and Parker Champagne with Abby and Brady Fernandes (front row left to right).


Allyson Champagne began the holiday tradition of being Santa’s helper in 2002. Every Christmas Eve for the last eleven years, Allyson arrives at The Doolittle Home to distribute gifts to each and every resident. An anonymous donor finances the cost of the gifts which are then personally selected and gift wrapped for each resident.

Allyson now brings her younger siblings, Riley and Parker and her fiance’s siblings, twins Abby and Brady Fernandes to help her. The children bring joy to the residents and the magic of the season is spread throughout The Doolittle Home. Delicious treats including cookies, chocolates and punch are served by the children to the residents.

The Doolittle Home is a special place and we are thankful for the many volunteers that make it a part of their tradition to visit and entertain our residents, especially during the holidays. We believe they enjoy it as much as our residents do and that’s why they keep coming back every year.

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The Doolittle Home Welcomes Many Holiday Visitors

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The Doolittle Home is a popular place during the holidays! The residents of the home were entertained with a variety of programs and events, including a few four-legged friends. Activities Director, Roz Champagne books all of the groups and is present for every performance, greeting the visitors and taking photographs.

The month began with a wonderful performance by the Silver Chimers from the Mansfield Coalition on Aging. Led by Mary Hourigan, the musicians used the unique chimes to fill the home with festive music. During the hour-long visit, the residents viewed a collection of ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas’ books from around the world dating back to the 1940′s. A group reading of Robert Frost’s poem, ‘Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening’ was a highlight.

The Smith and Sewell families entertained the residents with songs played on the piano and sung by all. Their children danced happily around the sun room engaging the residents.

The Boy Scouts of Pack 116 made their 8th annual visit to The Doolittle Home, singing songs of the season and distributing handmade containers of candy as part of their service projects. The boys interacted with the residents bringing joy to everyone’s day.

The Jaycees packed the home with over 100 visitors on December 19th. The dining room sparkled with the array of brass instruments to the delight of all. Carols were sung by the accompanying visitors including Clara, Karen and Emma Kierce with their dog, Pearl and Ed, AJ, Julianna and Allyson Butler with their cousin Hunter. Past President of The Doolittle Home’s Trustees, Jack Authelet was joined by his wife Marge and friend Margaret Gallo. Jack and Marge have been caroling at The Doolittle Home for 60 consecutive years! They brought their daughter as an infant in 1953, and have not missed a year. Margaret Gallo has not missed a  year since 1962. They consider it a meaningful part of the holiday season.

A special sign language version of the ‘Christmas Love Song’ was performed by 4th and 5th graders from Church of Emmanuel with their leader, Krista Richardson. The sign for love was displayed many times throughout the performance and enjoyed by the audience.

The piano students of Julie Law-Linck performed “An Afternoon of Holiday and Pops Piano Music” on Sunday, December 22nd. The students were Molly McElhinney, Macy Quinn, Elliot Linck,  Mary Mitchell, Jalen Coffin, Erin McLaughlin, Connor McNamara, Antonia Carbone, Hannah Blake, Jake Ferguson, Kendall Melinder, Mabel Linck, and Samantha Conley. Julie ended the program with a sing-a-long as she played the piano.

The month began with the Annual Holiday Party hosted by The Doolittle Home Board of Trustees for the residents and volunteers. The home is decorated with 3 beautiful Christmas trees inside and white lights decorating the outdoor landscape. The Doolittle Home thanks all who have made time in their busy schedules to entertain and visit us. The home is bursting with the spirit of the season!

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Adjusting to a New Home

Ruth (left) and Ebba are adjusting well to their new home.

Adjusting to assisted living is a challenging transition both for seniors and for their loved ones. One of the most difficult aspects of the change is the older adult living in a different place with new people. Often, a motivating factor for the transition to assisted living is concerns about older adults’ safety living alone. Also, many seniors require more consistent monitoring and increased social engagement, which families are unable to provide without assistance. Although the benefits of assisted living are fruitful, there are also difficult moments in the initial transition phase. Read below for some tips to an smoother transition from independent to assisted living.

Planning visits with friends and loved ones prior to the move is helpful. If you’re a caregiver or family member, facilitating the move is likely one of your roles. Seniors can enter their new home with plans that they can look forward to in the near and distant future. Visits do not have to be elaborate. A short shopping trip or chat at a local café often does the trick. Holidays such as Christmas and New Years can include more substantive plans like a home visit or a short trip away.

Click Here To View Our Activity Scrapbook Of Holiday Celebration Photos

If you’re a senior transitioning to a new home, keeping an open mind is very important. No one is denying the difficulty of leaving all that was familiar and moving to a new environment. There are certain choices you can make to help yourself transition more easily. Socializing with other residents and staff members is one way to feel connected to your new home. Attend events hosted by the assisted living facility and bond with your neighbors.

Consider Respite Care at Doolittle Home

Doolittle Home offers respite care for stays of seven days or more. This allows an older adult to get a taste of Doolittle Home and engage in the daily activities and events while the caregiver takes a vacation or prepares for the holidays. With three hot meals a day, social interaction with the staff and residents in a bed and breakfast atmosphere, it is a wonderful experience for the older adult. The caregiver can be at ease knowing all needs, including nursing care and medication management is handled by our dedicated professional staff.

To schedule a tour call Deanna Willis 508.543.2694.
Click Here To Watch What Others Have To Say About Us

References
http://www.agingcare.com/Articles/Assisted-Living-Transition-for-elderly-parents-136537.htm

 

 

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The Interact Club’s 3rd Annual Visit Is Fun for All

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On Saturday, November 30th, The Foxboro Interact Club entertained and socialized with the residents of Doolittle Home. The afternoon included crafts and games, tea and refreshments. The group brought an array of baked goods along with china plates, china tea cups and damask napkins to make the event extra special for the residents. One of the highlights of the program was a very competitive rendition of the Wheel of Fortune game with holiday prizes for the winners. The puzzle that stumped the residents was “Double Stuffed Oreos” which is a fairly new entry into the cookie world.

The Foxboro Interact Club is a community-based club that is open to any Foxboro student in grades 8 – 12. The Foxboro Interact Club is sponsored by The Foxboro Rotary Club, which provides support and guidance, but the teen club is self-governing and self-supporting.  Each year, Interact Clubs need to complete at least two community service projects and through these efforts, Interactors develop a network of friendships, learn the importance of developing leadership skills and personal integrity, as well as demonstrate helpfulness and respect for others.

Lew Gordon is the leader of the group and Nancy Sepe is the parent organizer.

Doolittle Home is a very popular destination for local groups, especially during the holidays. Activities Director Roz Champagne has more than ten visits scheduled for the month of December. The holiday performances are greatly enjoyed by the residents and staff of the home which is elaborately decorated inside and out for the season.

To view photos of other activities at Doolittle Home, please click here.

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Holiday Card Drive For Troops

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Residents, family, staff and volunteers signed and addressed 160 cards to contribute to Hero Helpers of America’s Holiday Card Drive. The goal of the Hero Helpers is to send 5,000 cards to our service men and women overseas this holiday season. The non-profit organization was started less than two months ago by two Foxboro natives.

Doolittle Home Activities Director, Roz Champagne organized the effort. “Our residents are always excited to participate in service projects for community organizations. It is wonderful to watch volunteers of all ages work together for a great cause,” commented Roz.

Doolittle Home was chartered in 1915 and has been providing exceptional care for the elderly in downtown Foxboro. Located in a gracious home, it feels more like a New England Bed and Breakfast than a retirement community.

Come see for yourself! Call DeAnna Willis at 508-543-2694 for a private tour. In the meantime, you can take a virtual tour of Doolittle Home by clicking here.

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November Is National Diabetes Month

Nutrition is an important part of the medical treatment plan for diabetes. Diet is critical for management of the disease because of the way that diabetic bodies change when glucose enters the system. For people without diabetes, the insulin in their bodies moderates the amount of glucose in the blood. When someone has diabetes, the body does not make enough insulin and/or use insulin in the correct way. Type 2 diabetes typically occurs after the age of 40. Therefore, middle and older adults are at risk for developing the disease. Read below for how older adults can prevent the onset of diabetes and curb the effects once diagnosed.

Older adults who are diabetic must maintain a strict diet and exercise regimen to ensure that diabetes does not worsen. Making healthy food choices in line with a diabetic diet is not as challenging as it was ten, twenty, or thirty years ago. The National Institute of Health advocates for people to divide their plate in fourths. Half of the plate should include non-starchy vegetables.  The other half of the plate should be divided equally into grains and starchy vegetables and protein. If you’re unsure how to proceed with an appropriate food plan, consult a nutritionist recommended by your primary care doctor.

Physical exercise is another essential part of older adults staying healthy with diabetes. Even if engaging in physical activities is difficult, there are always accommodations you can make. For example, if you enjoy playing golf, forgo the cart and walk the course. If you love to dance, join a Zumba class and take breaks when you’re feeling fatigued. At a minimum, stay active and hydrated. Finding a community that supports your healthy lifestyle is a perfect first step. For more information about Diabetes, visit the national diabetes website.

Doolittle Home provides medication management for all of our residents. We also have a dietician on staff who works with our dietary team to ensure that each resident’s nutritional needs are carefully met. Three healthy and delicious meals are provided to our residents each day with the availability of snacks between meals. In addition, we have 24/7 nursing staff in the home who also monitor residents’ daily health. To learn about all the many services provided at Doolittle Home, please click here.

References
http://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/diabetes-older-people-disease-you-can-manage#sthash.E6Y1Paf8.dpuf

 

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Doolittle Home Serves Refreshments at Foxboro Veterans’ Day Program

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Doolittle Home continued our tradition of serving refreshments to attendees of the Foxboro Veterans’ Day Observance. The program, held on Monday, November 11, 2013 at the Foxboro High School,  honored veterans with a Veterans’ Day Proclamation from State Representative Jay Barrows and a keynote address from Michael Davison, Lt. Col. Retired USAF. A Patriotic medley was performed by The Serenading Seniors including “America The Beautiful” and “God Bless America.”

Doolittle Home Board President Joanne Pratt commented, “We are honored to recognize our local veterans by sharing our “Foxboro Famous” cookies. Doolittle Home appreciates being a part of the fabric of Foxboro for almost 100 years and enjoys supporting community events.”

DeAnna Willis, Executive Director of Doolittle Home and Marie Crimmins, Board Vice President invited attendees to enjoy the refreshments and thanked them for their service.

For more information on Doolittle Home, please click here.

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Fall Open House Welcomes Visitors with Doolittle Home Hospitality

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Doolittle Home was buzzing with visitors on Sunday, November 10th during our open house. Guests were cordially invited into the gracious home with the scent of baking gingerbread and were treated to delicious homemade cookies and treats  prepared by our talented kitchen staff.

Guests were able to experience the “Doolittle Home Difference” first hand with personal tours provided by our dedicated Board Members Joanne Pratt (President), Marie Crimmins (Vice President), Edward McIntyre, Catherine Hickey and Florence Spillane.

Doolittle Home is a private nonprofit retirement home providing extraordinary care for those 65 and older for nearly 100 years. Residents live within a beautiful home that looks and feels more like an elegant New England Bed & Breakfast than a long term care facility. Doolittle Home provides 24/7 nursing care, a licensed nursing unit, and onsite nutrition with a registered Dietician, Physical, Occupational and Speech therapies, a wide range of activities and hairdressing services, all included in an affordable monthly fee.  A small resident to staff ratio ensures that your loved one receives the very best care possible.

If you’d like to speak with our Executive Director or take a tour of our facilities, please contact Virginia at 508-543-2694 x27 or email virginia@doolittle-home.org. To view our website, please click here.

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A Special Halloween Visit For Doolittle Home Residents

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Doolittle Home residents enjoyed a costume parade on Halloween morning courtesy of the Crossroads Children Center. Over a dozen pre-school aged children proudly wore their costumes and sang Halloween songs to grinning Doolittle Home residents. This year’s parade was a nod to more traditional characters such as a policeman, fireman, cheerleader, Captain Hook, Power Ranger, a lady bug, princess, Star Wars storm-trooper and a military soldier. The children were very outgoing and brought immense joy during their hour-long visit with the residents of Doolittle Home.

For over 15 years, the Crossroads Children’s Center has been a devoted friend of Doolittle Home, visiting with residents for an hour-long treat each and every month. Roz Champagne, our wonderful activities director of 9 years, schedules these much anticipated visits. Roz says, “It is always a pleasure to welcome the children and their teachers, Marie Williams and Jane Connolly, to Doolittle Home. We are consistently entertained by their programs and personalities.”

Meet Roz Champagne

Roz is adored by the residents. Starting as a volunteer in 2001 before being employed as a Dietary Aide for Doolittle Home, a natural fit was realized when the Director of Activities position became open in January 2004. Roz spends the morning in the nursing unit, followed by various activities, such as a morning stretch program, music appreciation, puzzles, games, poetry, and current events. In the afternoon, Roz can be found in the main house, entertaining the residents with bingo, spelling bees, trivia, amongst other enjoyable activities. Roz books all the entertainment for Doolittle Home with visitors ranging from Crossroads Children Center singing their little hearts out for residents to various community groups and musicians. Doolittle Home’s van provides transportation for trips within the region for out of the home services, such as doctor and dentist appointments, local shopping, and trips to Norton Public Library. Roz is coordinator of Doolittle Home’s volunteer program. Volunteer activities include therapy dog visits, a woman’s discussion group, poetry hour, card making and crafts, as well as a one-on-one program, where volunteers are paired with residents. On Wednesdays each week, bowling is a featured activity, with the mornings focusing on competition and afternoons featuring an assisted bowling program designed for those needing extra care from Doolittle Home’s physical therapist, Marge Howard. Roz is a native North Attleboro resident with 8 children, 14 grandchildren, 2 great grandchildren and one very tired husband. Roz always brings her sense of humor and passion for helping others.

For more information on Doolittle Home, please click here

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Doolittle Home Invites The Public For A Special Fall Open House

Walk through the door and you’ll immediately sense the “Doolittle Home Difference”, a private nonprofit retirement home providing extraordinary care for those 65 and older for nearly 100 years. Residents live within a beautiful home that looks and feels more like an elegant New England Bed & Breakfast than a long term care facility. Doolittle Home provides 24/7 nursing care, a licensed nursing unit, and onsite nutrition with a registered Dietician, Physical, Occupational and Speech therapies, a wide range of activities and hairdressing services, all included in an affordable monthly fee.  A small resident to staff ratio ensures that your loved one receives the very best care possible.

Doolittle Home, located at 16 Bird Street in Foxboro, cordially invites you to join us for a special Open House event on Sunday, November 10th from 2-4pm. Guests will enjoy refreshments featuring our irresistible homemade “Foxboro Famous” cookies, musical entertainment and special giveaways.

You will have the opportunity to meet with Doolittle Home’s caring, friendly staff, Board of Trustees, residents and tour this exceptionally special home.

Our affordable all-inclusive fees provide peace of mind for Doolittle Home’s Life Care, Month To Month and Respite Care residents. We look forward to meeting you, answering your questions and for you to experience first hand the Doolittle Home Difference.

Please feel free to contact us at 508-543-2694.  Visit our website by clicking here for a virtual tour and additional information.

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Doolittle Home Explains About The Importance Of Adhering to A Medication Regimen

Adherence to a medication regimen is one of the most important parts of an older adult’s life. Unfortunately, there is a relationship between a person’s age and the amount of medications they are required to take. The older people become the more medication they need to maintain their health.  Older adults have difficulty maintaining a medication regimen due to memory issues and visual impairment. Only 20-50% of older adults take medication as prescribed. When older adults do not take medication as prescribed, they are at great risk of developing new medical health issues or exacerbating the ones for which the medication treats.

One of the primary reasons why medication adherence is overlooked is due to lack of meaningful communication between older adults and caregivers. When caregivers are unaware of older adults’ medication management routine, they are unable to support them in adhering to the schedule. Many older adults prefer to live in their own homes in order to maintain an independent lifestyle. When this is the case, adult child caregivers should ensure that their parents are taking medication as prescribed. Although older adults might feel defensive at first, adult children can lay out medication each day to remind parents which pills to take at a particular time. Over time, caregivers can continue to increase the amount of support they provide the older adult regarding medication. For example, caregivers can count medication and monitor older adults taking the pills. If this is not possible, you may need to hire a visiting nurse or select a senior care living option such as Doolittle Home to administer the medication.

Meet Linda
Linda Faria, LPN Dedicated and caring staff member for over 12 years. “It’s an honor and a privilege to work at Doolittle Home, where residents receive such quality of care. ”

About Doolittle Home

Doolittle Home is a private nonprofit retirement home providing extraordinary care for those 65 and older. Residents live within a beautiful home that looks and feels more like a comfortable New England Bed & Breakfast than a long term care facility. Doolittle Home also has a Supportive Nursing Care Unit for those residents needing additional care. We offer significantly more personal care than an Assisted Living Facility with a small resident to staff ratio. Up to 32 women & men can call Doolittle Home their home at any given time. Care options include Life Care, month to month and respite care. There are no hidden fees at Doolittle Home, including 24/7 nursing care. For more information about Doolittle Home call 508.543.2694 and ask for DeAnna Willis.

Click Here For Doolittle Home FAQ
Click Here For A Virtual Tour of Doolittle Home

References
http://www.pharmacytimes.com/publications/issue/2011/January2011/RxFocus-0111

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Breast Cancer Awareness for Older Women

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Breast cancer rates are rising every year. In 2013, 296,980 women will be diagnosed with the disease. Although the rates of breast cancer are increasing, the 5-year relative survival rate has improved significantly since the mid-1970s. Older women are considered a special population in the breast cancer community because of their unique needs. More than 40% of new cases of breast cancer occur in women ages 65 and older. There are many different ways that older adults can be proactive in preventing breast cancer and treating it once diagnosed.

Older adults should engage in self-breast exams and yearly mammograms to prevent breast cancer. Creating a preventative treatment plan with a doctor to avoid breast cancer is an important first step. Some older adults might have difficulty getting to a doctor. Therefore, supportive friends and family members should make an effort to ensure that they attend yearly appointments and annual mammograms. Given the recent publicity about breast cancer and medical treatment options, it is likely that you will have many questions for the doctor. As always, bring written questions to the appointment.

Aside from engaging in regular self-breast examinations and yearly mammography, older adults should consult with their doctor and review their medication regimen. A recent study tied high blood pressure medication to breast cancer in older adults. This study does not mean that older adults should not take high blood pressure medication. Rather, in light of these findings, older adults should have a conversation with their doctor and create an individualized treatment plan that minimizes the risk of developing new conditions.

Meet Christine Kent, Director Of Nursing Services

Christine came to Doolittle Home in 1997. A graduate of St. Elizabeth School of Nursing, Christine began her Doolittle Home career as a night shift nurse. Christine has been Director since 2005, and oversees a staff of 25 nurses, CNAs, as well as the Physical Therapist, Medical Director, Dietician, Social Worker, and Pharmacy Consultant. Christine says, “Working at Doolittle Home is like working with family. We all work together as a team to get the job done. What each of us brings to the residents, makes the difference.

References
http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2021546314_hypertensionbreastcancerxml.html
http://ww5.komen.org/KomenNewsArticle.aspx?id=19327354166

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Doolittle Home Announces The Appointment Of Three New Board Members

Pictured left to right: Cathy Hickey, Fran Kleindienst and Florence Spillane

“The current board and staff are happy to welcome new board members Cathy Hickey, Fran Kleindienst and Florence Spillane, all residents of Foxboro. Doolittle Home is working hard to extend its reach and by engaging new leaders, we can create and promote an environment that supports positive initiatives for our current and future residents as well as the elders throughout the community. ” said DeAnna Willis, Executive Director of Doolittle Home.

About Doolittle Home’s new Board of Trustees;

Cathy Hickey was asked by Beth Ferencik, a longstanding supporter and Board Member to join Doolittle Home’s Board of Trustees. “I’ve always had an interest in learning more about the Doolittle Home. My daughter Katie works here part time and has spoken highly of the staff and residents.” Cathy is employed as a project manager for the Federation For Children With Special Needs. In her spare time, Cathy enjoys reading and the company of her husband Bob and two teenagers.

Fran Kleindienst was invited to serve on the Board of Trustees by Joanne Pratt, Doolittle Home’s President. “I always thought about serving on the board. My daughter April worked here as a nurse while she was in school and I’ve visited many residents throughout the years”. Fran is now retired from her career as an insurance agency manager. She has lived in Foxboro for her entire life and volunteered on the COA and Friends Of Foxboro Board of Directors for 10 years. Fran shares her talents on the Fundraising committee.

Florence Spillane is an attorney that specializes in a range of general law services located in Foxboro. Invited to serve on the Board by Ed McIntyre, an enduring supporter, fellow attorney and Board Member of Doolittle Home, Florence always admired the home and thought very highly of this charming community. She lives in Foxboro and is the mother of two twin girls, now 26. Florence serves on the By Law and Fundraising Committees.

The three new members join an eleven-member board that oversees Doolittle Home’s finances,  policies and practices, strategic planning and community outreach.

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Older Adults On the Road

 

Older adults and those who love them need to recognize that driving skills change as we age. Taking an honest look at how older adults’ driving has changed can allow us to incorporate some protective factors for mobile seniors. Every senior has a unique driving context, but there are some common challenges experienced by all.

After the age of 70, individuals are more likely to have fatal car crashes due to decreased vision, sluggish reflexes, and impaired hearing. Even if you’ve had a perfect driving record for your entire life, the effects of aging may compromise your ability to drive safely. Recognizing this as a reality is a very important first step. After you’ve recognized some of the inevitable risk factors associated with aging and driving, it’s now time to take some preventative steps to be sure you stay safe on the road.

Schedule yearly physical, eye, and hearing appointments. It’s important to always keep your annual appointments with doctors. If there is something that requires treatment it is better to have that information sooner rather than later. If you have a chronic or acute medical condition that prevents full range of motion, a physical therapist can work with you on finding aids that could help you stay mobile.

If driving is something that is no longer an option for you, there are many other ways of getting around. Link up with a local carpool or shuttle service. Walking and bike riding are other options that can help you stay mobile and fit at the same time.

 

References

http://www.helpguide.org/elder/senior_citizen_driving.htm

 

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Doolittle Home Honors Staff At Annual Trustees Picnic

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The food service staff at Doolittle Home spared no effort in preparing delicious food for the Annual Trustees Picnic. The weather was perfect making this special occasion shine. After visiting with residents and listening to Doolittle Home’s live musical entertainment in the blooming garden, the Board Of Trustees then acknowledged service anniversaries for staff members, with Lori DiTomaso receiving the top recognition for 20 years of dedicated service as Food Service Supervisor followed by Edwina “Scotty” Scott in Laundry for 15 years at Doolittle Home. Nursing staff member, Sharon Kantzer, Caitlyn Kelly in Dietary and Terry Bouffard, CNA also received a certificate and pin for 10 years of devoted service. Kristie O’Connell, CNA and Holly Collins in Housekeeping for 5 years of loyal service for the home.

During the ceremony, DeAnna Willis, Executive Director, spoke about the continuous efforts of the entire staff, including activities, maintenance, housekeeping, dietary, and the professional medical staff, collaborating daily to provide extraordinary care, which is the hallmark of the Doolittle Experience. “The service provided to our residents is very personalized.  Our staff have been with us for a very long  time.  They know our residents well and I believe that’s what sets us apart from other retirement communities in the area.  We know what we do well…and that is continuity of care for our residents and their families.”

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Acupuncture For Older Adults

 

Many older adults are struggling with chronic health issues. Long-term health concerns are a strain on individuals, families, and societies. Health conditions are challenging for any person regardless of the diagnosis. However, chronic conditions pose unique challenges for the patient, doctor, and the patient’s family. Acupuncture is a holistic approach to treating chronic medical conditions that have yielded positive and mixed scientific results. Read below to learn more about the benefits and limitations of acupuncture for older adults, particularly as a way to relieve chronic pain.

Acupuncture is the oldest healing practice in the world, originating in China. Healing is facilitated with the insertion of needles and heat at particular pressure points in the body. According to the National Institute of Health, acupuncture opens channels in the body, known as meridians, in order to increase the flow of energy (qi). A theory of acupuncture is that pain and other conditions occur because energy channels are blocked or slow moving at various parts of the body.

If you’re thinking about consulting your doctor about acupuncture, you are not alone. A 2007 National Health Interview Survey said that 3.1 million Americans reported to have used acupuncture in the last year. The most common conditions that brought individuals into the acupuncturist were pain or musculoskeletal issues. The results about the effects of acupuncture on various health conditions are still mixed, though. For example, a 2009 review on pain-relieving effects of acupuncture compared to placebo was inconclusive.

Choose personalized care, peace of mind comfort and a cozy home-like setting at the Doolittle Home. Call 508-543-2694 for a personal tour. Click Here To Visit Our Website

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Sleeping Well Into Older Adulthood

Older adults experience changes in sleeping patterns and habits that are part of normal phases of development. Changes in sleeping patterns, though, do not mean that sleep quality should diminish. Older adults require quality sleep every night in order to function at the highest level each day. According to Harvard Medical School, there are several common factors that cause sleep disturbance for older adults. Poor sleep habits and sleep environment are critical factors that influence older adults’ sleeping patterns.

Poor sleep habits are varied and dependent on the lifestyle of the individual. Falling asleep in front of the television or dozing off on the couch are two examples of poor sleep habits. To fix poor sleep habits, outline a nighttime ritual and follow it. Research suggests turning off electronics an hour before bed. Drinking non-caffeinated tea and reading a book are common activities that precede sleep. Refrain from engaging in activities in your bed that are not related to sleeping or intimacy.

Your bedroom is the environment in which you fall to sleep. Look around your bedroom and identify parts that bring around anxiety and stress. Is your bill basket on your nightstand, reminding you of the debt on your credit card? Do you have clutter stacked on your dresser? Change aspects of your bedroom that cause anxiety. Your bedroom should be a place that elicits peace and calm. If you’re not sure how to transform your sleeping environment, reach out to people who love you for advice.

About Doolittle Home

For an affordable monthly fee, Doolittle Home of Southeastern MA, provides 24/7 nursing care, a licensed nursing unit, onsite nutrition with a registered Dietician, Physical, Occupational, Speech therapies various activities and hairdressing services.  A small resident to staff ratio ensures that your loved ones receives the best care possible.

Doolittle Home is proud of its top-notch reputation and recently received a Deficiency Free Survey from the Massachusetts Board Of Public Health.  With increasingly stringent regulations, achieving the deficiency-free rating is exceedingly difficult. These surveys, and the subsequent ratings, are a useful tool for prospective and current residents; their families and health care practitioners, to make informed choices about the quality of a long term care facility.

 It takes an entire team effort to achieve this distinguished rating.  DeAnna Willis, Executive Director with the continuous efforts of the entire staff, including activities, maintenance, housekeeping, dietary, and professional medical staff, collaborate daily to provide exceptional care, which is the hallmark of the Doolittle Experience.

Doolittle Home is located at 16 Bird Street Foxboro, MA conveniently situated on the corner of Bird and Baker Streets minutes from Foxboro Common. Click Here to visit our website.

Interested in scheduling a tour? Call DeAnna Willis 508-543-2694

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Forgiveness-It’s Good For Your Health!

Mother Theresa once said, “If we really want to love we must learn how to forgive.” Forgiving, though, is not an easy process. In fact, the difficulty of forgiving others is often the reason for the ending of friendships and romantic relationships. The scientific research on forgiveness sends the clear message that forgiveness is good for your health. If you want to reconcile with someone who harmed you, read below to learn more about forgiveness and its role in your life.

The Mayo Clinic describes forgiveness as the decision to “let go of resentment and thoughts of revenge.” Forgiveness allows for peace and calm to wash over you rather than rage and resentment. Walking through life holding anger for someone’s behavior invites stress. Stress might be present if your heart rate increases, pupils dilate, and hands tremble. You may also eat more when you are stressed and snap at others.

If you’re ready to begin forgiving, there are many different ways to move through the process. Talk with a friend, family member, or trained mental health professional about the context of your relationship with the person you are forgiving and the particular behavior(s) you are forgiving. Forgiveness may include a conversation with the person where you discuss the issue(s) directly. Or, you might engage in forgiveness individually without involving the other person. You might combine both approaches and others depending on your particular situation. There is no one way to forgive.

About Doolittle Home

Doolittle Home’s all inclusive options provide peace of mind for Doolittle Home’s Life Care, Month-To-Month and Respite Care residents.

For an affordable monthly fee, Doolittle Home of Southeastern MA, provides 24/7 nursing care, a licensed nursing unit, onsite nutrition with a registered Dietician, Physical, Occupational, Speech therapies various activities and hairdressing services.  A small resident to staff ratio ensures that your loved ones receives the best care possible.

Doolittle Home is proud of its top-notch reputation and recently received a Deficiency Free Survey from the Massachusetts Board Of Public Health.  With increasingly stringent regulations, achieving the deficiency-free rating is exceedingly difficult. These surveys, and the subsequent ratings, are a useful tool for prospective and current residents; their families and health care practitioners, to make informed choices about the quality of a long term care facility.

 “It takes an entire team effort to achieve this distinguished rating. ” DeAnna Willis, Executive Director notes “with the continuous efforts of the entire staff, including activities, maintenance, housekeeping, dietary, and professional medical staff, collaborate daily to provide exceptional care, which is the hallmark of the Doolittle Experience”.

If you or your loved one are interested in a tour please call 508.543.2694. Ask for DeAnna Willis.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Doolittle Home Open House Event Was A Huge Success

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The Doolittle Home open house event was a huge success. Fragrant flowers adorned the home as guests arrived on Sunday, May 19th to take a tour and find out more information about Doolittle Home’s retirement living options. Refreshments were served, including Doolittle Home’s  “Foxboro Famous” homemade cookie treats and live entertainment filled the home with classical music.

We welcomed new trustees who helped to give tours and interact with visitors, while staff members answered questions. Door prizes were awarded to 3 lucky seniors.

If you missed the open house and would like more information about Doolittle Home please call 508-543-2694.

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Doolittle Home Hosts Tri Town Chamber Business Event

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Sparkling wine, gourmet cheeses, homemade Doolittle Home cookies and good conversation are a perfect way to wind down from a busy work day. Over thirty business  professionals attended the Tri Town Chamber of Commerce’s business networking event hosted here at Doolittle Home.

Professional relationships strengthen everyone in the business community and Doolittle Home  is proud to be a Tri Town Chamber  member.

If you missed the event and would like personalized information about Doolittle Home please call us at 508-543-2694 and we will arrange a one on one or group tour.

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You’re Invited To Doolittle Home Retirement Home Southeastern Massachusetts

 

 

 

 

 

Please Join Us For A Special Open House Event at the Doolittle Home
When: Sunday, May 19th 2-4pm
Where: 16 Bird Street Foxboro, MA

Walk through the door and you’ll immediately sense the “Doolittle Difference”, an extraordinary retirement home dedicated to compassionate elder care for nearly 100 years.

Guests will enjoy refreshments featuring our irresistible homemade “Foxboro Famous” cookies, musical entertainment and special giveaways.

Doolittle Home staff and trustees will be on hand to answer questions and treat you to a personal guided tour.

Our affordable all inclusive options provide peace of mind for Doolittle Home’s Life Care, Month-To-Month and Respite Care residents.

For an affordable monthly fee, Doolittle Home of Southeastern MA, provides 24/7 nursing care, a licensed nursing unit, onsite nutrition with a registered Dietician, Physical, Occupational, Speech therapies various activities and hairdressing services.  A small resident to staff ratio ensures that your loved ones receives the best care possible.

Doolittle Home is proud of its top-notch reputation and recently received a Deficiency Free Survey from the Massachusetts Board Of Public Health.  With increasingly stringent regulations, achieving the deficiency-free rating is exceedingly difficult. These surveys, and the subsequent ratings, are a useful tool for prospective and current residents; their families and health care practitioners, to make informed choices about the quality of a long term care facility.

 It takes an entire team effort to achieve this distinguished rating.  DeAnna Willis, Executive Director with the continuous efforts of the entire staff, including activities, maintenance, housekeeping, dietary, and professional medical staff, collaborate daily to provide exceptional care, which is the hallmark of the Doolittle Experience.

Doolittle Home is located at 16 Bird Street Foxboro, MA conveniently situated on the corner of Bird and Baker Streets minutes from Foxboro Common.

Please feel free to call us with any questions prior to the Open House 508.543.2694. Thank you.

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Rockland Trust Donates A Senior Friendly TV To Doolittle Home

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We would like to take this opportunity to thank Rockland Trust, a trusted provider of financial  solutions located in New England, for their loyal support to Doolittle Home.  The donated large screen TV and DVD player will enhance each residents’ mind, body and spirit through a variety of stimulating interactive games and movies.

“We are grateful for the generous support of Rockland Trust,” stated DeAnna Willis, Executive Director of Doolittle Home. “Eyesight and hearing can deteriorate as people age, yet watching TV and reading are activities that never grow old. Rockland Trust’s large screen TV donation will nourish the minds of our elder residents who are hearing and sight challenged. Our residents are truly enjoying the new TV”.

To learn more about Rockland Trust visit www.RocklandTrust.com We are indebted for their continued support and  share in the joy of our mission: Compassionate Elder Care with a Clear Difference.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Sharon Singers Sing Like Angels At Doolittle Home

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On April 12th there was a sacred music concert performed by the Sharon Singers of the Sharon Mennonite Bible Institute from Pennsylvania. Each year these talented singers travel the eastern seaboard and Canada to entertain thousands of lucky audiences. Residents enjoyed the peaceful acapella angelic voices and caring presence. The Sharon Singers primarily perform in larger venues and we are grateful to each and every performer for their graciousness to the Doolittle Home. One resident said “They sing like angels”.

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Show Mom How Much You Care

Mother’s Day is right around the corner. How will you show your Mom how much you care about her on this special day? Are you stumped on how to ring in Mother’s Day this year? It’s easy to get “present block” and draw a complete blank on how to celebrate your Mom in a meaningful way. Planning your celebration in advance will ensure its success. Read below for some ideas on how to share a special day with your Mom without breaking the bank.

Offer your Mom a day of relaxation. How does your Mom like to unwind? If she enjoys gardening, purchase flowers and gardening supplies for her. Plant flowers together. Watching a movie in a cool theater followed by a homemade picnic lunch is a different way to relax. Engaging in mindfulness meditation and yoga practices together is yet another activity that gets stress out of the way and peace back into the picture.

Eating is a very popular way that many daughters choose to bond with Mom. Attend a spiritual or religious service with your Mom to honor her place in your life and treat her to a gourmet brunch afterwards. If baking and cooking is up your alley, make your own buffet of her favorite foods, decorating the table with pictures of you both across the years. Extend invitations to other mother-daughter couples to bring some liveliness to the event.

Regardless of what activity you choose, your Mom will be happy just to spend time with the apple of her eye.

For those who’s mom has passed and would like to make a tribute in her name Click Here

Please call Doolittle Home located in Southeastern Massachusetts for additional information or to arrange a tour. We invite your inspection and comparison of our unique services to the elderly. There are many options available to those making decisions for aging loved ones but nobody can match the care and commitment of Doolittle Home.

What we offer is;
*Licensed Nurses 24/7 365 days per year
*Administer medications
*Serve 3 meals per day under the direction of a licensed dietician and certified food service supervisor
*Assist in a residents grooming and dressing
*Launder and iron a resident’s personal clothing
*Provide bed linens and towels
*Transport residents to medical appointments
*Provide a wide variety of stimulating activities
*Monitor residents daily for proactive care
All this for one low monthly fee. Call 508-543-2694 to speak with our caring staff about your options. Click Here To Watch Video Testimonials

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The Importance Of Nixing Salt From Your Diet As An Older Adult

March is National Nutrition month! If you’re an older adult struggling with diet-related health issues, now is the time to overhaul your nutrition and eating behaviors. A report from ABC News suggests that by 2030 more than half of all Americans will be obese. The obesity epidemic will cost the U.S. up to $66 million dollars in treatment costs. In addition to the costs to our country, obesity also impacts your health and pocketbook. Cutting out salt from your diet is one of first steps to getting and staying healthy.

Salt and sugar are not all bad. In the appropriate portions salt and sugar are necessary for your overall health. Given the increase portions of salt and sugar in almost all food products, most of us are not in dire need of these nutrients. You can jumpstart cutting down on salt and sugar in two simple ways. The American Dietetic Association’s Complete Food and Nutrition Guide Read suggests rinsing all canned vegetables, beans, tuna, and chicken. Rinsing your canned food will reduce salt intake by 40%. Another surefire way to facilitate healthy eating is to dine out less and cook home more. When you cook your food from home you have more control over the amount of salt in your diet.

If you are concerned about your health and diet, schedule an appointment with your doctor. Making changes to your diet is serious business and requires the supervision of a trained professional. When you meet with your doctor, inquire about a nutritionist to help you make a reduced-sodium meal plan.

Doolittle Home serves three delicious meals per day under the direction of a licensed dietician and certified food service supervisor. Please call us additional information or to arrange a tour. We invite your inspection and comparison of our unique services to the elderly. There are many options available to those making decisions for aging loved ones but nobody can match the care and commitment of Doolittle Home.  Click Here To Watch long time resident Evie talk about Doolittle Home.

References

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/americans-obese-2030-report-warns/story?id=17260134#.UOxlKaVm2-8

 http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/04/19/10-ways-to-cut-out-salt-and-sugar/#ixzz2HPY52YjX

 

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Seasonal Affective Disorder Blues?

Are you concerned about an older adult who seems withdrawn, disengaged, tired, and irritable? These signs may point to a number of issues. However, they also might be related to the cold, dark, winter season. Many people suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), a psychological condition where people become depressed during particular seasons, namely winter. Similar to the effects of other mental health disorders, SAD can have a ripple effect on various aspects of an individual’s life. Symptoms of SAD include but are not limited to: a change in appetite, weight gain, change in sleeping patterns, loss of energy, and inability to concentrate.

If you suspect that an older adult in your life is struggling from SAD, encourage him/her to seek professional treatment. SAD can only be diagnosed by a trained professional, which could be a psychologist, therapist, or doctor. The National Institute of Health suggests that people struggling from SAD adopt a walking routine during the daylight hours. If exercise is out of the question because of medical issues, older adults can sit outside and enjoy the sun, even if it’s just for a few minutes a day.

Of course, taking a vacation to a warm place is a wonderful option. If you can afford to take your older parent or friend for a weekend get-a-way, do it! Perhaps you could intertwine a short vacation into a gift for your parent or friend. At a minimum, engage your parent or friend in conversation about how they are feeling, validating their emotions and perspectives.

The activities calendar at The Doolittle Home is designed with the individual resident in mind.  Daily, residents choose from a variety of programs to challenge the mind, body and soul. The Doolittle Home provides daily exercise classes, and unique social opportunities, such as engaging games and movies, arts & crafts, interesting lectures as well as live entertainment. Doolittle Home provide residents with community interaction and involvement. The activities program also fully encourages and supports family involvement and volunteers. Click Here To View Activities Scrapbook

Call 508-543-2694 to arrange a personal tour with DeAnna Willis, Doolittle Home’s Executive Director.

 

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Preserving Memories With Scrapbooking

The year 2012 has come and gone and 2013 is well underway. How are you going to preserve the wonderful memories that you and your loved ones shared last year? If you are caring for an older adult, you may also be wondering how to solidify the last year for him/her. Whether you’re caring for a parent, grandparent, or friend, creating a scrapbook to commemorate their life in 2012 is a perfect way to make a memory. Read below to learn how to compile a scrapbook for the older adult in your life.

First, you want to organize important mementos from the last year in one place. If you’re creating the scrap book for someone, this might be tricky. Search around your home for paraphernalia that reflects an activity that you and your older adult friend or parent shared. Ask your friend or family member directly for memorabilia that he/she would like to include in the scrapbook. Anything that lies flat is appropriate to include. Once you have the mementos, it’s time to decide upon a theme. Did the year reflect a series of achievements? Were grandchildren born? Was a new job acquired? Decide what is most salient and conjure some images that reflect the theme.

Next, it’s time to compile and decorate the pages. This is where your creativity kicks in! Remember that each page should only contain a few pictures, decorations, and maybe a quotation or two. Reduce clutter on the pages by spilling over to another page if need be. After you’ve compiled the pages, it’s time to present your gift!

Doolittle Home in Foxboro is unlike many retirement facilities and nursing homes these days. Doolittle Home is privately and independently managed by a volunteer board of local officers and trustees. Doolittle Home received the highest rating in Massachusetts for personal care provided to residents. One resident’s daughter said “I have such peace of mind knowing that Mother is where she needs to be and is being cared for by such caring people.” For Doolittle Home’s virtual tour click here and to read about the friends of Doolittle Home click here.

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Taking On the Weight Loss Challenge For Spring

Weight loss is one of the most difficult goals that Americans place on their list of resolutions. According to the Center for Disease Control, over one-third of Americans are obese. Advertisers promise us quick fixes for weight loss. How many times have advertisements promised you 10 pounds of weight loss in one week? A rapid, 30 day juice cleanse? We believe that these quick fixes will be the answer to all of our weight problems. Given the statistics, these fads are not working. Read below to learn more about why weight loss is such a challenge, particularly for older adults.

Findings from the National Weight Control Registry suggest that individuals need significantly more exercise than we thought. Five thousand individuals in the registry who lost 60 pounds and maintained their weight loss reported one hour of exercise every day! For older adults, exercising for an hour may not be possible. Therefore, it’s important for older adults to work with an exercise specialist to create a regimen that is right for them.

Eating healthy food in moderation is another piece to the puzzle that is often neglected. Older adults may feel pressured to eat in social situations, especially if festivities center on food. This may be especially prevalent over the holiday season.  According to Linda Bacon, associate professor of nutrition at UC Davis, “We get a tremendous amount of pressure to eat for reasons other than nurturing ourselves, and over time, people lose sensitivity to hunger/fullness/appetite signals meant to keep them healthy and well nourished.”

Doolittle Home serves three delicious meals per day under the direction of a licensed dietician and certified food service supervisor. Please call us additional information or to arrange a tour. We invite your inspection and comparison of our unique services to the elderly. There are many options available to those making decisions for aging loved ones but nobody can match the care and commitment of Doolittle Home.  Click Here To Watch long time resident Evie talk about Doolittle Home.

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Older Adults Falling in Love

Falling in love as an older adult is a blissful, fulfilling feeling. You’ve likely fallen in love many times before in your life. But, there’s something unique about meeting a special person in your older years. Once you’ve felt an attraction toward someone there are emotional, psychological, and physiological responses that occur in your body. If you think that the feelings associated with falling in love are random, they are certainly not! Many researchers and scientists have studied the connection between your mind, body, and heart. And, the verdict is in- there are chemicals associated with the various stages of love.

The fledgling state of love includes butterflies fluttering around in your stomach. No matter what your age, the early stages of love remain the same. Your cheeks will be flushed, eyes dilated, stomach aflutter, and heart racing. Just like when you were a teenager, you’ll never want to leave your partner’s side. Testosterone and estrogen are key players during this stage. Even though testosterone is often associated with men, it is also present in women during moments of romantic attraction. Attraction is also facilitated by neuro-transmitters called monoamines.

As your relationship evolves and deepens, you and your partner will enter into the attachment stage. This stage is fueled by oxytocin, the chemical released during childbirth. The attachment stage is when you and your partner begin building a collaborative plan for your lives. These may include buying property together and long-term healthcare planning. Before rushing into commitment with someone it is important to assess whether you share the same values and life goals.

Doolittle Home provide residents with community interaction and involvement. The activities program also fully encourages and supports family involvement. If you are interested in a personal tour…..and falling in love with Doolittle Home  call DeAnna Willis 508.543.2694.

 

References
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/hottopics/love/

 


 

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In Memory of Richard Cross

Doolittle Home’s Board of Trustees, staff and residents mourn the loss of devoted twenty year volunteer Richard Leon Cross who died suddenly as the result of an automobile accident Dec. 20, 2012. His talents, humor and friendship will be missed by all.

An honor graduate of Bangor High School he moved to Boston in 1960 to attend Bentley College. An honor graduate of Bangor High School he moved to Boston in 1960 to attend Bentley College. He earned an associate and bachelor’s degree in accountancy in 1962 and 1966, respectively; and after that a Master of Business Administration from Northeastern University. As an undergraduate, he was a faculty assistant and a member of the accounting correcting department. Richard went on to the Boston office of Ernest & Young, filling the post of staff auditor for three years.

In 1969 as a certified public accountant, he returned to Bentley, where he joined the accountancy faculty and remained for 40 years until his retirement in 2008. His contributions ranged across the institution which included teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels, chairing the accountancy department, coordinating the certified public accountant review course, and serving on many faculty committees. In the realm of college governance, he represented the faculty on the academic affairs, institutional advancement and nominating committees of the board of trustees. From 1991 to his retirement, 17 years, Professor Cross was the school’s ceremonial marshal. Professor Cross’ unfailing commitment to students inspired several awards, notably, the Gregory H. Adamian Award for Teaching Excellence and the Outstanding Advising Award. His mentoring role extended to coordinating the Bentley Business Bowl case competition and advising student organizations such as Beta Alpha Psi and Kappa Pi Alpha. His professional memberships included Massachusetts Society of Certified Public Accountants and American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

The Becker certified public accountant review tapped his expertise as an editorial board member and instructor. He also taught courses in Boston for the U.S. Civil Service Commission, Northeastern University and Harvard Business School. Until his death, Professor Cross was long committed to community causes and active with Bay Village Neighborhood Association, Boston; Doolittle Home, a life-care retirement home in Foxborough, Mass.; and Hillel Council of Greater Boston. “Richard was a dear friend and our hearts are broken from the loss.” DeAnna Willis, Doolittle Home’s Executive Director shared.

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Volunteering: It’s Good For Your Health

Many Americans volunteer. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that over 60 million people volunteered between 2010 and 2011. Volunteering is great for your health and your community. Research suggests that individuals who are 60 years and older have the most to gain from volunteering. The Corporation for National and Community Service reports a strong correlation between volunteering among older adults and health. The report says: “those who volunteer have lower mortality rates, greater functional ability and lower rates of depression later in life than those who do not volunteer”.

Choosing an opportunity is an important step in the process of volunteering. Brainstorm with loved ones and identify the goals you’d like to accomplish in your volunteer experience. Do you want to work with adults or children? Would you like to do something indoors or outdoors? Are you interested in working with animals? In addition to your interests, determine the time frame you estimate works for your lifestyle. If you would like to volunteer only on holidays than your search will look different than if you want to volunteer on a weekly basis.

Before signing on to a volunteer opportunity consult with your friends and loved ones. People who care for you may have unique insights into the type of opportunity that is best for you. It is also important to consult with your doctor to determine the benefits and risks to your health, especially if the opportunity involves manual labor. For more information about volunteering Click Here

What makes Doolittle Home Different? True Life Care.

Life Care ensures care for the resident for life, regardless of changes in health or financial status. Residents do not turn over all their assets – they pay an up-front fee for life care based on expected costs of care for their life expectancy according to actuarial tables. That cost is offset by his/her monthly Social Security and/or any pension income to determine the cost of admission. Many residents sell their modest homes, pay their admission and still retain investments of their own. With the up-front fee, residents are guaranteed care for the remainder of their days regardless of changes in health.

Life Care provides full services in addition to room and meals for life. As health changes dictate, residents have access to the fully accredited Nursing Unit. There are no additional or incremental fees with Life Care. Changing medical needs are addressed by staff and licensed providers in a familiar setting.

Life Care provides the resident’s room, three meals per day plus snacks, medication management, nursing staff, activities, etc. If a resident requires a stay in the nursing unit, there is no additional charge. Life Care even provides a hairdresser on site each week because looking good helps residents feel good. Regardless of changes in health, care is provided for life.

Come see for yourself. Schedule a private tour by calling 508-543-2694 and ask for DeAnna Willis, Executive Director.

 


References

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/volun.toc.htm

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2013 New Years Resolution

New Years resolutions are easy to make and easy to break. If you’re an older adult, it’s likely that you’ve made dozens of resolutions over the years. Perhaps there were some resolutions that you kept and others that you broke. Psychologist and author Richard Wiseman reports that only 52% of people who make resolutions believed that they could keep them. Even more surprisingly, only 12% succeeded in keeping their resolutions at all. As you reflect on previous years, what were the barriers that kept you away from achieving your goals? What were the strengths that helped you fulfill your goals? If you’re committed to being part of the 12% this year, read below for some tips on how to make realistic resolutions and keep them throughout the year.

Write down your resolutions using clear, specific, measurable objectives. A resolution to “be healthier” is not as powerful as a resolution to “attend jazzercise class every Monday and Wednesday”. Hang your resolution somewhere in your home, preferably in a place that you see every day. Set small goals that are realistic and manageable. If you’re currently eating one or two healthy meals each week, do not resolve to eat 21 healthy meals come January. Instead, resolve to eat one healthy meal a day, or, five healthy meals each week. Start slowly and increase over time.

Use the month of December to prepare yourself for transformation in 2013. Recruit friends and family to support you and ask how you can support them, too. Helping your friends meet their goals is a wonderful way to solidify an already close bond.

Worried about care of an older relative while you travel for the holidays? Doolittle Home can put your mind at ease. We provide respite care in our beautiful facility. Your loved one will receive attentive personal care from our staff, enjoy our delicious meals and participate in all activities. Give yourself the gift of peace of mind. Call Doolittle Home 508.543.2694 for information. Click Here To Watch Pat Talk About her Experience With Doolittle Home

 

 

 

 

 

 

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B-I-N-G-O

Residents at Doolittle Home enjoying playing Bingo. The rousing game of bingo that Americans love has a long and rich history. Bingo originated in the early 1500s. The roots of the game can be traced to an Italian lottery, Lo Giuoco del Lotto D’ Italia. Interestingly, the Italian version of bingo is still played every weekend in certain parts of the country. In the late 1700s wealthy French aristocrats played a game called, Le Lotto, which shares many features with the Italian and American version of the game, bingo. German children also played a version of bingo. Yet, they used the game as an educational tool.

Bingo, once called Beano, finally reached Atlanta, Georgia in the early 1900s. The game was found primarily at fairs and carnivals, providing a jovial activity for children and families to play while they were enjoying the festivities. Edwin Lower, a toy salesman from New York, overheard someone yell the word, “Bingo!” instead of “Beano!”. The name stuck and Lower became committed to promoting the game. He and a math professor collaborated and created thousands of bingo cards with unique combinations.

Bingo is now commonly played at churches, community centers, and schools to raise money. The idea of using bingo as a way to increase recreational funds also began in the early 1900s. Catholic churches relied on funds accrued from bingo to build savings. Aside from fundraising efforts, bingo has also been used as a way for community members to bond. Bingo is a carefree, high-energy game that keeps people on their toes. Many Americans love playing Bingo with friends and family. The game can be played with hundreds of people in a large auditorium. Or, it can be played at a kitchen table with a small family.

Doolittle Home provide residents with community interaction and involvement. The activities program also fully encourages and supports family involvement and volunteers. If you are interested in finding out how to volunteer at Doolittle Home Click here

 

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The Interact Group Visits Doolittle Home

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November was an exceptionally busy month for activities at Doolittle Home. Entertainer Duane Sullivan filled the home with music, a new afternoon tea party program was added and the Interact Group of Foxboro provided a morning of crafts.

Please call Doolittle Home for additional information or to arrange a tour. We invite your inspection and comparison of our unique services to the elderly. There are many options available to those making decisions for aging loved ones but nobody can match the care and commitment of Doolittle Home.

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Alzheimer’s Disease And Holiday Caregiver Tips

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, affecting nearly 5 million Americans. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, AD accounts for 50 to 80 percent of dementia cases. Unfortunately, there is currently no cure for AD.  However, President Obama recently signed into law a plan to study the disease, called the National Alzheimer’s Project. Until medical professionals find a cure for AD, families are left alone cope with the effects of AD. If you or one of your elderly parents have been diagnosed with AD, read below to learn some tips on how to slow its progression.

There is not one “right” way to slow the progression of AD. However, there are several lifestyle changes that individuals can make in order to keep their bodies healthy and minds sharp. The American Medical Association makes a strong argument about the importance of early detection. If you’re concerned about your memory or the memory of a loved one, make an appointment with the doctor. A recent study published in the journal, Neurology, reported that exercise slows the progression of AD. Before you begin exercising, make a plan with your doctor to learn the appropriate exercises for your condition. Another recent study, published in Neurology, reported that engaging in mentally challenging activities such as crossword puzzles might delay the memory loss associated with AD.

“Alzheimer’s can’t wait,” said Harry Johns, president and CEO of the Alzheimer’s Association. “For the first time ever, families grappling with this progressive, degenerative and ultimately fatal disease can have real hope that a national strategy addressing the escalating Alzheimer’s crisis is coming.” If you or a loved one is coping with this disease, reach out for help and support from medical professionals, friends, and family.

The eight-week stretch between Thanksgiving and New Years can be the most stressful time of the year for those caring for elderly relatives.

The stress isn’t just due to the holiday activities—shopping for gifts, baking, addressing and sending out holiday cards, organizing transportation for holiday expeditions, etc.—that take up additional time and add additional responsibilities to a caregiver’s already packed life.  Holiday time is family time and when family members come together there are a lot of challenges to the caregiver about how they are doing
their job;” and to the fact that the weather “is ‘iffy,’ and that makes doing everything more difficult;” and to the fact that the “work and family schedules and care routines that enable caregivers to keep all the balls in the air are disrupted during the holidays.”

“It’s no surprise,” adds the social worker, “that caregivers say they feel overwhelmed, out of control and out of patience during the holidays. They are.”

Nothing can stop the disruptive impact the holidays have on a caregiver’s life, but planning
for the physical, emotional, and fiscal upheaval that comes with them can definitely help caregivers survive them.

The following strategies are for family caregivers to weather whatever the “festive season” throws your way.

1. Make a holiday to-do list/calendar—including family gatherings, parties, kids or grand kids programs, due-dates for getting cards and gifts into the mail, getting holiday goodies baked, etc.—then figure out which activities you should do and which ones you can delegate to the folks in item number 2.

2. Put together a support network Make a list—family, friends, community agencies and service providers— and get comfortable delegating.

3. Learn to say no. This isn’t selfish, it’s self-empowering. If you don’t, you and the person you are caring for will be so exhausted you won’t be able to enjoy things.

4. Don’t aim for perfection. Be flexible and when you need to, change your expectations to fit a situation. That way, you aren’t disappointed or guilt-ridden…[and] you actually gain the time and the energy to participate in things and enjoy them.

5. Maintain your health. Don’t skip medications or medical appointments; exercise; and eat and drink to sustain energy, but avoid rich foods, sugar, and alcohol. All boost energy for a bit, then leave you burned out.

6. Find a de-stressing mechanism. For some people, it’s deep breathing, for some it’s meditating, for others it’s humor, or journaling or scrap booking.

7. Don’t forget immediate family “Neglecting them adds to feelings of guilt, so plan time to be in the moment with them, to celebrate with them, to participate in activities and traditions just with them. This isn’t selfish, it’s life-affirming.

For more information on about Alzheimer Disease visit http://www.alz.org/

Interested in finding out more information about Doolittle Home? Call DeAnna Willis, Executive Director, for a personal tour. 508.543.2694. Click Here For Testimonials

 

 

References
“Total daily physical activity and the risk of AD and cognitive decline in older adults,” Neurology, published online April 18, 2012
“Being physically active may protect the brain from Alzheimer disease,” Neurology, published online April 18, 2012
C. B. Hall, Ph.D., R. B. Lipton, M.D., M. Sliwinski, Ph.D., et al: “Cognitive Activities Delay Onset of Memory Decline in Persons Who Develop Dementia.” Neurology, Volume 73, pages 356-361, August, 2009

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Doolittle Home Tri Town Expo Pictures

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Boo! Halloween At Doolittle Home

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Halloween was a special day for Doolittle Home residents.  Youngsters from The Crossroads Children Center visited Doolittle Home with smiles and dressed up as policeman, princesses, Superheros, fairies and more.

As a tradition, The Crossroads Children have been coming to Doolittle Home on Halloween for over 10 years, delighting the residents with a parade throughout the home and sprinkling fun in their path.

We thank teachers Marie Williams and June Connolly for accompanying the children.

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Meet Rev. Tim House

Tim is the minister of the Foxborough Universalist Church, in Foxborough Massachusetts. He began Friday’s chapel service for Doolittle Home residents in September.

In his “old life,” he was an actor, theater director, and college teacher. He taught at Emerson College in Boston for 20 plus years – full- and part-time – both in the Division of Performing Arts and the Division of Writing, Literature & Publishing.

In May of 2009, Tim received his Master of Divinity degree from Andover Newton Theological School.  He completed my two-year ministerial internship at First Church in Boston in June, and was the summer minister at the UU Congregation of Reading in July and August of 2010.   He was ordained at First Church in Boston May 22, 2011, and welcomed into preliminary fellowship by the Unitarian Universalist Minister’s Association at General Assembly in Charlotte NC in June.  He’s thrilled to become a UU minister before getting too old to remember where he put my glasses.

Tim is married to Ann Gary, who is on the board of the Unitarian Universalist Partner Church Council, which supports relationships between congregations in North America and those in Transylvania Romania, the Kasi Hills of north eastern India, the Philippines, and Africa. They have a 18 year-old son, Alex, who a very good epee fencer, and an eight year-old Australian terrier, Baci, who’s a very good eater and barker.

Tim is especially interested in people and their stories.  He believes we need to tell one another our stories and listen deeply to the stories of others.  He’s also interested in spirituality and the arts, and tries to find ways to use the many forms of applied, performance, and language arts to open pathways for sensing and expressing our connection with the Mysterious Source of Being.

“The Doolittle Home is such a comfortable place.  It really has the feeling of ‘home.’  The residents all tell me how comfortable and happy they are there.  It’s easy to see that they are safe and well taken care of physically, and it’s a pleasure to share in their spiritual time by leading some of their Chapel  services.”

Since 1915, Doolittle Home provides top of the line care for elders. If you would like a personal tour, call DeAnna Willis 508.543.2694. Click Here For Testimonial

 

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Hurricane Sandy Postpones Doolittle Home’s Exhibit At Gillette Stadium

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Doolittle Home will be exhibiting at the Mega Business EXPO at the exclusive Putnam Club at Gillette Stadium on Wednesday, November 14th, 2012 after the October 30th event was rescheduled due to Hurricane Sandy.

This FREE event is open to the public.

The event will feature over 130 local businesses, tastings from area restaurants, giveaways, and great views of Gillette Stadium.

The Mega Business Expo hours are 3pm to 7pm. An after hour is from 5pm-7pm for those who would like to mingle with local businesses on a more personalized and relaxed level.

The Doolittle Home’s Booth is #214 and will be raffling a gourmet gift basket.

We hope to see you!

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Dental Hygiene: Facts and Suggestions

Good oral hygiene and dental care is critical to the well being of older adults. Unfortunately, many older adults have dental issues that could have been prevented through routine care and regular visits to a dentist. If you are an older adult with concerns about your dental care, read below for information about factors that increase the likelihood of dental issues and ways to improve your dental hygiene.

Dental Issues
As men and women age, body tissues also age. Specifically, the soft tissues in your mouth become softer and less plastic. A reduction in saliva production increases the difficulty of chewing. According to the Missouri Gerontology Institute, older adults’ teeth may become more brittle, which increases the chances that they will decay at a quicker rate and break more easily. When older adults’ gums are cut or scraped, the cuts may become easily irritated and inflamed, which slows the healing process.

Dental Hygiene

The American Dental Association suggests several ways that older adults can improve their dental hygiene. They recommend brushing and flossing at least twice daily. If you are unable to hold a toothbrush, there are accessories that older adults can use to accommodate circumstances that prevent brushing and/or flossing. The decrease in saliva production makes rinsing that much more important for older adults. Individuals should rinse their mouth after meals to ensure that food particles haven’t stuck to the gums or between teeth. Visiting a dentist regularly is critical. If you do not currently have a relationship with a dentist, inquire about services in your area.

If anxiety is keeping you from visiting a dentist, talk to a friend, family member, or mental health professional. Good dental care is essential not only for cosmetic but also for medical reasons. Ask a loved one to support you in making an appointment with a dentist and accompanying you to the visit.

Doolittle Home residents smile when Dr. Victor Leung from Foxboro Dental comes to visit. The residents boast how gentle and kind he is. To read more about Dr. Leung click here

Interested in finding out more information about Doolittle Home? Call DeAnna Willis, Executive Director, for a personal tour. 508.543.2694

 

 

 

References
American Dental Association (2012). Oral Longevity. Retrieved September 25, 2012 from: http://www.ada.org/orallongevity.aspx.
Jerry Michel (1993). Basic Dental Health of Older Adults. Retrieved September 25, 2012 from: http://extension.missouri.edu/p/GG5.

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Doolittle Home Hosts This Month’s BNG Meeting

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Thank you to all who attendAdd Cincopa photoed the BNG (Bristol Networking Group) meeting at Doolittle Home today. Thank you to Karole Nicholson for organizing the group, and thanks you to Pam Greenfield for educating us on Ballot question #2 does a person with a terminal illness have a right to end his or her life. To read more about the law click here

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Breast Cancer And Older Adults

According to the Mayo Clinic, women over the age of 60 have an increased chance of developing breast cancer. Older women that have a family history of breast cancer or exposure to radiation from treatment for another cancer are at an elevated risk for developing breast cancer. Conducting at-home breast examinations is important for all women. However, it is critical for older women to perform breast examinations given their increased risk for developing breast cancer.

If you or an older loved one has been diagnosed with breast cancer, there are several treatment options. According to the American Cancer Association, available treatment options include but are not limited to: chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, targeted therapy, and surgery. Choosing a treatment is a very personal decision that occurs between the patient, her family, and the medical team. If you’re supporting an older woman during breast cancer treatment, BreastCancerCare reminds individuals to listen to patients’ experiences with empathy and patience. Several studies indicate that older women will want to regain a sense of normalcy quickly after treatment. This usually includes restoring independence. Discuss with your loved one how she can regain her independence and stay safe.

Hearing that you or a loved one has a breast cancer diagnosis is unimaginable. Yet, it happens to millions of women everyday. If you or someone you love is battling breast cancer, social support is a critical piece of maintaining a high quality of life. Visit with your loved one often and provide emotional support. If you live far away or have a busy schedule that keeps you from visiting, work with your loved one to find a local support group. Connecting with others who share a cancer diagnosis could be the first step to finding life long friends during this difficult time.

Doolittle Home retirement community sets the standard in Massachusetts for quality care. We are proud of the staff and board of trustees who make this possible. Doolittle’s licensed nursing staff is on-site 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Family members know that their loved ones are receiving the best possible care, giving them total peace of mind. To schedule a tour call DeAnna Willis 508.543.2694. Click Here For A Virtual Tour

 

References:

The Mayo Clinic. (1998-2012). Risk Factors. Retrieved on September 10, 2012 from: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/breast-cancer/DS00328/DSECTION=risk-factors

American Cancer Society. (2012). Treatments and Side Effects. Retrieved on September 10, 2012 from: http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/index

Breast Cancer Care. (2012). Partners, Friends, and Family. Retriever September 10, 2012 from: http://www.breastcancercare.org.uk/family-friends-partners%20

 

 

 

 

 

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You’re Invited

If you are considering options for long-term care or that of your parents or loved ones, we cordially invite you to explore the Doolittle Home, a “hidden gem” located just off Foxboro Common on Bird Street.

Please join us for a special Open House event on Sunday, 
September 23rd from 2-4 pm.

Guests will enjoy refreshments featuring our homemade “Foxboro Famous” Doolittle Home cookies, musical entertainment and delightful giveaways.

Doolittle Home staff and Board of Trustees will be on hand to answer questions and help provide resources to those who may be caregivers. Doolittle Home Special Open House Invitation. We look forward to meeting you.

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Is CPR Right for My Loved One?

CPR For Older Adults

Understanding the benefits of CPR on older adults’ health is important, especially if an older person is in your care. Determining whether CPR is an appropriate medical treatment for your loved one requires some knowledge of the intervention itself. Read below for information to facilitate a conversation with your loved ones about CPR.

What is CPR?

CPR stands for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. CPR is a necessary medical process to keep someone alive when their breathing, heartbeat, or both has stopped. Medical professionals push on an individual’s chest and blow into his/her mouth to mimic a natural heartbeat and breathing. The process may also include inserting a tube into the person’s mouth and/or utilizing a ventilator that will consistently circulate air throughout the person’s lungs for longer periods of time.

What are the Benefits?

The benefits of utilizing CPR are that the person receiving the treatment may live longer than if he/she didn’t receive the treatment. A recent medical study reported that patients who were in their 40s and 50s had the highest rate of successful heart and breath resuscitation. Success rates declined slightly with age, but overall results demonstrated that CPR is effective with an older adult population.

Is CPR Right for My Loved One?

If you’re not sure, wait and think it through. This is a very important decision that you don’t have to make alone. Consider the benefits of CPR and talk it over with people you trust. If you’re making the decision on behalf of an older adult, explore his/her understanding of CPR and provide education if necessary.

With nearly a century of experience in caring for people, Doolittle Home offers a safe and dignified retirement choice. In a bed and breakfast atmosphere, with all the modern amenities, Doolittle Home proudly provides;
24/7 nursing care
A licensed nursing unit
Onsite nutrition with a registered Dietician
Physical, Occupational, Speech therapies
Many activities
Hairdressing and housekeeping services are included
A small resident to staff ratio ensures that your loved ones receives the best care possible
All inclusive pricing. No hidden fees.
Several options include month to month, respite and life care that provides care for life
Diabetes management
Incontinence management and more… Click Here For A Virtual Tour

For a personal tour of Doolittle Home call 508.543.2694. Doolittle Home is located at 16 Bird Street, Foxboro, MA 02035.

References Swor, R. A., Jackson, R. E., Tintinalli, J. E. and Pirrallo, R. G. (2000), Does Advanced Age Matter in Outcomes after Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest in Community-dwelling Adults?. Academic Emergency Medicine, 7: 762–768. doi: 10.1111/j.1553-2712.2000.tb02266.xVideo courtesy of American Safety Training Institute

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Something New At Doolittle Home

Joanne Pratt, Board Of Trustee President for Doolittle Home brought her passion for miniatures to exhibit for the residents. Doolittle Home showcases many talents during activities. Joanne has traveled the world seeking inspiration and materials for the miniatures she’s created. If you’re interested in a personal tour call 508.543.2694. Ask for DeAnna Willis.

Watch the video below of Joanne talking about this very interesting subject

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Giving Caregivers A Break At Doolittle Home

Summer is coming to an end soon, the holidays are arriving shortly and life continues with responsibilities and tasks to complete. Respite Care for the elderly is  vital for family caregivers to cut down on the stress and dedication involved.

At Doolittle Home, we’ve seen this all too often. Caregivers have dedicated so much of their time and energy to caring for their elderly parent or loved one and often find that they have little time for their own needs. As their loved one’s physical health decreases or mental acuity worsens, the family caregiver becomes more involved in that care and less able to take the time to refresh themselves. It’s often a 24-hour, 7-day-a-week commitment.

For so many, the daily challenges for caring for an elderly family member are just a part of their life.  However, no one person can do it alone.    Sometimes a caregiver is far away from family and friends who may offer assistance or sometimes they are the sole caregiver for their loved one. Caregivers who try to do it all find themselves at an increased risk of depression and other health problems as a result of this stress. Having respite care enables the primary caregiver to keep providing rather than burning out or becoming ill herself. This temporary removal from the situation may also serve to restore one’s energy and help to promote balance in one’s life. This is why respite care for the elderly is needed.

What is Respite Care? 

Respite Care is substitute care given so that the person who is the primary caregiver may get some relief.  Respite Care may be for just a week, a couple of days, one day or even just one hour.  It may be arranged to occur on a regular basis, or even just one time.  Respite Care for the elderly is a service that supports and maintains the physical and emotional health of a caregiver by providing temporary care to an aging loved one.

Many caregivers dedicate much or most of their free time to taking care of their elder family member.  In an increasingly mobile society where some family members have moved out of the general area, the remaining family member(s) have an increased burden and very little chance to go anywhere, do anything, or even have a family vacation.

Respite care can take several different forms.  If a care giving family would like to take some time off for a family vacation, they may arrange for a senior living home respite care such as Doolittle Home in Foxboro, MA. When space is available, some senior living homes offer temporary housing and care. A nice advantage to this may be the opportunity to test the senior living center without having to commit to moving there permanently.  The elder adult will be well cared for while enjoying the company and activities with the residents in the home.

A recent article in The Help Guide <<http://www.helpguide.org/elder/respite_care.htm>>  had this list of some of the benefits of respite care for the elderly….

  • R – Renewal and Relaxation: Taking a walk, strolling leisurely through the mall, visiting a museum or doing whatever brings joy can calm a caregiver, decrease their heart rate and improve their mood.
  • E - Energy: To be effective in their own work, a caregiver must be afforded time to re-energize. Even an automobile won’t run on empty.
  • S – Space: Getting away from the care-giving situation for even just a few hours helps with relaxation and brings a renewed sense of purpose.
  • P – Pleasure: A caregiver must remember that they have the right to enjoy life even if they feel their care recipient cannot do the same.
  • I – Identity: A caregiver must be intentional in maintaining a sense of self.
  • T – Time away from the situation allows a caregiver to see it more clearly and upon return, adjustments can be made to improve the experience.
  • E - Engagement: Social isolation can be a huge problem for caregivers. It’s important to take time to engage with friends and family by sharing lunch, taking a shopping trip or a walk in the park.

The bottom line:  The caregiver must first take care of themselves in order to be effective in caring for others.

Doolittle Home’s Respite Care option eases the burden by providing the highest quality of standards, compassionate care, comfort, and absolute peace of mind. To schedule a personal tour call DeAnna Willis, Executive Director 508-543-2694 x 11

Click Here For Testimonial

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Doolittle Home Resident Celebrates 103!

At 103, Anne Stringer still has moxie, a sense of humor, and a spring in her step. “One drawback to turning 103 is I can only do one thing at a time. I was once able to do two or three things at a time and now one .” confided Anne.

Anne usually wins at the weekly bingo and participates in the assisted bowling program at Doolittle Home.  Having spent many years at Pine Tree Gardens on Chestnut Street in Foxboro, MA, Anne came to Doolittle Home in 2003.

Jay Barrows, a State Representative, presented Anne with a proclamation certificate. “She’s an amazing woman.” Jay shared as he handed over the special gift.

Anne’s week-long celebration included flowers, many cakes and family visits.

What makes Doolittle Home so special? Founded in 1915, The Doolittle Home provides retirement living for both men and women with a unique twist: the contract here guarantees care for life. It is the only retirement community licensed by the Commonwealth of Mass. as a “Life Care” facility.

  • Services include: 24/7 nursing care, medication management, special dietary planned meals, incontinence management, diabetes management.
  • Features: On-site activities
  • Accreditation/certifications: Perfect, deficiency-free survey from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH)
  • Charming Bed and Breakfast setting with all the modern amenities.

Doolittle Home is located in the heart of downtown Foxboro with easy access to highways. Call DeAnna Willis for a personal tour. Click Here For A Virtual Tour

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What To Talk About With Nana….

That awkward silence.  Do you feel like you might run out of things to talk about with your elderly relative, neighbor or friend ? Remember, seniors are, after all, simply older people.  As older people, they will have had many experiences in their life that they might like to share with you.

A recent article on ECaring.com had these tips to share to help start a conversation….and keep it going.

•    Use open-ended questioning –Practice using the 4 W’s (Who, What, Where, When, and How) to re-frame direct statements as questions: “What was the best vacation you ever took?”; “Who did you most admire as a child?”

•    Accentuate the Positive – With an upbeat voice, give a kind –but genuine—remark (“You’re looking very energetic today!”). Avoid vague inquiries like “How are you today”, which could invite a litany of ailments or complaints. Replace with an exclamation of or some positive (and authentic!) observation.

•    Use prompts – Bring photo books along for your visit. This may be enough to generate hours of conversation.

•    Be patient – Some older adults tend to consistently talk about the same one or two topics. Validate his or her concerns by listening authentically.

•    Read aloud – Reading to an older person can be a powerful way to connect. All types of narratives provide room for deeper discussion.  Your voice alone can be a soothing, comforting source

•    Find out what makes them smile – When starting a conversation with an older person, ask what they enjoy. Topics such as asking about their favorite foods, television shows, movies, books, and music are a great place to start. Take a look around their room to guess what the person might like. Focus and build upon what brings this person joy

•    Talk about the past – Reminiscence is a very important therapeutic mechanism for older adults. Many older people find joy in talking about events in their past. You can ask about their childhood, first love, jobs.

Here are more tips for communicating with seniors that we found on AgingCare.com

•    Remember to speak distinctly. Some older adults do not like to admit that they cannot hear or understand the conversation around them.  Remain calm and talk in a gentle, matter-of-fact way, keep sentences short and simple, focusing on one idea at a time.

•    Don’t Condescend. Make sure your attempt to “turn up the volume” and slow down your speaking patterns doesn’t come across as condescending.

Still need help? Here are a few questions you can use to the break the ice when talking to a senior:
•    Do you have a favorite animal [food, color, song]?
•    Where did you go to school?
•    What was the first job you ever had?
•    When you were little, what was your neighborhood like?
•    What is your favorite type of music?
•    What are you most proud of?
•    How did your military experience shape your life?
•    How many grandchildren/children do you have?
•    When you were a kid, what did you do for fun?
•    What makes you happy?
•    Growing up, what were some fads you remember [hairstyles, clothing, dances]?

We are constantly reminded of the rich legacy of each of our unique residents here at the Doolittle Home.  Their memories span decades of history. Their hearts are filled with love for their family and friends.  Each and every one has their very own authentic story.  We are honored to have the opportunity to listen.

If you would like more information about Doolittle Home or schedule a private tour call DeAnna Willis 508.543.2694

 

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47 Years Later At Doolittle Home

What a pleasant surprise today. Marilyn Aulis and Kathleen O’Malley came back to visit Doolittle Home after working here nearly 47 years ago. Marilyn’s mother was the head of housekeeping and that is how she started working here as a teenager into her 20′s. Kathleen’s mother in law, Madelyn, was the Executive Director of Doolittle Home, where Kathleen was a nurses aid.

Stories were shared about dignitaries arriving at Doolittle Home for tea and snacks after Foxboro Field Day, their fond experiences here, how residents used to pitch in with washing dishes, and explained that Foxboro was a small tight knit community.

“Hairdressing was in the basement next to the kitchen, and Mrs. Willard talked about the Civil War.” Kathleen explained.

This is what makes Doolittle Home so special. Even after 47 years, there is a special place in the hearts of those touched by The Doolittle Home.

If you would like more information about Doolittle Home or schedule a private tour call DeAnna Willis 508.543.2694

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Summertime Safety Tips For Diabetics


It’s Summertime!  Here, in New England, that means high temps and humidity that can leave just about everyone a little wilted.  But folks who are diabetic may have a special challenge.  “People with diabetes have an impaired ability to sweat, which predisposes them to heat-related illnesses, as do uncontrollable high blood sugars,” according to Mayo Clinic’s Dr. Adrienne Nassar.

Temperatures of 80°F (about 27°C) or above, especially with humidity, can affect medication, testing supplies, and the health of a diabetic.  A diabetic’s body has a harder time handling high heat, combined with humidity (high heat index)

Here are suggestions from CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation for taking care of yourself during hot weather:

  • Heat can affect your blood glucose (sugar) levels and also increase the absorption of some fast-acting insulin, meaning you will need to test your blood glucose more often and perhaps adjust your intake of insulin, food and liquids.
  • Drink plenty of fluids, especially water, to avoid dehydration. Avoid sugar-sweetened beverages such as sweet tea and sodas.
  • If your doctor has limited how much liquid you can drink, ask what to do during times of high heat.
  • Check package inserts with medications to learn when high temperatures can affect them. Take medications with you if you will need to take them while you’re away from home, and protect them from the heat.
  • If you’re traveling with insulin, don’t store it in direct sunlight or in a hot car. Keep it in a cooler, but do not place it directly on ice or on a gel pack.
  • Check glucose meter and test strip packages for information on use during times of high heat and humidity. Do not leave them in a hot car, by a pool, or on the beach.
  • Heat can damage insulin pumps and other equipment. Do not leave the disconnected pump or supplies in the direct sun.
  • Get physical activity in air-conditioned areas, or exercise outside early or late in the day, during cooler temperatures.
  • Use your air conditioner or go to air-conditioned buildings in your community.

The Joslin Diabetes Center offers these tips for diabetics:

First thing—keep hydrated!! The heat causes you to sweat more and dehydration will raise your blood glucose levels. Water is your best fluid replacement. All good news—no calories, no carbohydrate, and pure hydration. If you do choose fluids with calories, be sure to account for the carbs.

Check the sensation: The heat can fool you into thinking your low. Sweating, flushing, rapid heartbeat these are symptoms of hypoglycemia but they can also be a consequence of the heat. Before you take extra carb you may not need, check your blood glucose. A full glass of water and getting out of the heat may be the answer.

Keep your footwear on: It may be delicious wiggling your toes in the toasty, sun-baked sand, but if you have neuropathy or vascular problems, shoes on. Neuropathy can make it difficult for you to feel if your feet are getting burned. Ditto walking poorly shod on hot pavement. Unnoticed cuts and sores can let bacteria in, leading to a nasty infection.

Take a pump vacation: going to the beach perhaps? The insulin in your pump is just as sensitive to the heat as insulin in a vial. This may be the time to leave the pump at home and carry a pen or vial and syringe in a cool pack.

So be prepared and when you’re in the heat, and keep thinking about all the snow you’re not shoveling.

If you have diabetes and have any questions about coping with heat or other extreme weather conditions, be certain to consult with your medical team. Doolittle Home monitors residents blood sugar to ensure safe glucose levels.

What makes Doolittle Home special?  The Doolittle Home provides retirement living for both men and women with a unique twist: Besides the charming bed and breakfast atmosphere, great food and activities, Doolittle Home’s life care option guarantees care for life. It is the only retirement community licensed by the Commonwealth of Mass. as a “Life Care” facility. 24/7 nursing care included. Accredited nursing unit located on premises and only available to residents. All inclusive fees mean knowing how to budget. Call today to experience the Doolittle Difference! More than assisted living…Total Life Care! Come see why we received a deficiency free survey from the state of Massachusetts. Call DeAnna Willis, Executive Director at 508.543.2694 to schedule a tour.

 

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Beach Party Comes To Doolittle Home

What a great afternoon for a “Beach Party” and “Treasure Hunt.” Roz Champagne, Doolittle Home’s Activities Director and two special volunteers, brother and sister team Christopher and Lindsay, brought fun, laughter and summer adventure to our residents.

The afternoon began with serving Salted Rimmed Margaritas, fresh limes and a special Cranberry Cocktail, followed by delightful light fare of Tabouleh on special whole grain sesame crackers, cajun crab dip and a fresh and juicy fruit salad hand diced by Roz and Doolittle Home resident Mary Korman.

The serving table was adorned with shells and colorful tumbled sea glass. As the party unfolded, it was time for the treasure hunt, where trinkets of coins and jewels were to be scooped from the sand to win a prize. The winners for today were Dottie, and Irma with the grand prize awarded to Pauline , who grabbed a huge scoop of sand and a sparkling diamond like ring.

To set the mood, Roz looked dazzling in her beach attire while in the background was music by Jimmy Buffet to create a  “tropical” ambiance. For more activities photos click here

Doolittle Home wants to also thank Bay Coast Bank for generously donating the sand buckets which happen to be “Doolittle Home Blue”.

To learn more about the Doolittle Home – please visit our website by clicking here.

 

 

 

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Doolittle Home Honors Staff

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The food service staff at Doolittle Home spared no effort in preparing delicious food for the Annual Trustees Picnic. Even though the event took place indoors due to the scorching heat index, the special occasion went on without a hitch. After visiting with residents, and listening to Doolittle Home’s musical entertainment, the Trustees then honored service anniversaries for staff members, with Anne Alves receiving the top recognition for 35 years of dedicated service as head nurse. June O’Leary and Sioban, received a certificate and pin for 5 years of service, Christine Kent , Director of Nursing for 15 years with the home, and Roz Champagne, Activities Director for 10 years of service.

To Watch DeAnna Willis, Executive Director of Doolittle Home, honor each staff member click here.

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Doolittle Home Is Now On Pinterest

What is Pinterest and how does this relate to Doolittle Home?

Pinterest is a sharing platform in which you “pin” pictures to your board. The picture sharing site allows you to create categories of photographs, pin your pictures, and share them with other people. In a nutshell, Pinterest is a virtual pinboard.

We enjoy sharing pictures and the many aspects that make Doolittle Home special. Click Here To See Doolittle Home’s Pinterest Boards

We’d love to show you how special Doolittle Home really is! Call today for a personal tour. 508.543.2694

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Ah! To Be A Kid Again!

Bubbles..Bubbles..everywhere. Smiles and childlike fun for all took place on Thursday, June 7th when the Crossroads Children Center in Foxboro came to visit and bring joy to Doolittle Home’s residents.

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Thank You

The Open House at Doolittle Home was a glorious success. Many potential residents and their families toured Doolittle Home and enjoyed the delightful treats served.

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We thank each and everyone who attended. If you are interested in more information about Doolittle Home call 508-543-2694. Click Here For A Virtual Tour

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Karen Talks About Doolittle Home

Karen Laper, MS, RD, LDN is Doolittle Home’s Dietary Consultant since August of 2003. Watch Karen talk about Doolittle Home and her experience with the staff and residents. We thank Karen for her years of service and dedication to Doolittle Home.

Call for a personal tour 508-543-2694. For additional information visit our website click here

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Leading Cause Of Injuries For Those 65 And Up

Falling Down Goes Up With Age
Seniors Are More Susceptible To Taking A Fall

Did you know that in the U.S., falls are the leading cause of injuries in people 65 years old and up?  Understandably, accidents and health conditions are the leading culprits.  What’s really surprising is that most of the falls occur at home, while performing common activities.

What causes the falls?  Balance can be affected by medications, alcohol, heart disease, low blood pressure or arthritis.  Poor eyesight and hearing, decreased coordination and strength, slower reflexes and other disabilities can be factors.  Within the household, worn carpets, newly positioned furniture, clutter on the floor, poor lighting, electric wires, stairs and wet floors can lead to trouble.

Fortunately most falls are minor and result in a quick recovery.  But the severity of injury increases with age with the most common injuries being head traumas and fractures to the hip, wrist and spine.  Even when there is no physical injury, there can be a dramatic affect on the senior and their family.  Fear of future falls can decrease confidence, which can lead to less independence and social life.

Stairways in the home of a senior can be a hazard.  Make sure there are sturdy handrails on both sides, the steps are clear, the surface is in good condition and the lighting is bright and even.  (Shadows can cause problems.)

Tips For Avoiding Falls

  • Avoid clutter on the floors, especially in the normal paths of traffic.
  • Don’t leave something in a pathway “just for a second”.  It’s usually the wrong second.
  • Place electrical and telephone cords out of pathways.
  • Carpets should be wall-to-wall and low pile.
  • Do not wax floors or use non-skid wax.
  • Steps should be no taller than 6 inches and all steps should be the same height and depth.
  • For those with poor vision, attach a bright colored piece of adhesive tape to first and last steps…and any place there is a variation in the height or depth of a step.
  • Avoid the use of stairs when possible.  This may mean rearranging the use of rooms or even installing a motorized lift.
  • Chairs and sofas should be high enough and firm enough to make it easier to sit or stand.
  • Chairs should have high backs and sturdy armrests so they can be used to support sitting and standing.

Doolittle Home’s physical therapist works with our residents on balance issues. If you would like to find out more information about Doolittle Home, call 508.543.2694.  We invite you to take a tour and experience what we call “The Doolittle Difference.” Click Here To Watch Doolittle Home’s Movie

About Doolittle Home

With nearly a century of experience in caring for people, Doolittle Home, offers a safe and dignified retirement option. In a bed and breakfast atmosphere, with all the modern amenities, Doolittle Home offers 24/7 nursing care, a licensed nursing unit, onsite nutrition, Physical, Occupational, Speech therapies and hairdressing services. Doolittle Home is proud of its top notch reputation and recently received a Deficiency Free Survey from the MA Board Of Public Health. Doolittle Home is located within walking distance to downtown Foxboro and set in a beautiful residential neighborhood.

(Sources: American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, A Variety Of Articles & Books)

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New Video About Doolittle Home

Doolittle Home has created a new video. The video showcases what makes Doolittle Home stand out. If you would like a personal tour, please call DeAnna Willis 508-543-2694. Enjoy!

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Rockland Trust Donates Skype Computer To Doolittle Home

Rockland Trust has donated a senior friendly computer to the Doolittle Home. The donation will enable families and Doolittle Home residents to Skype via video chat to loved ones who live a distance from here.

“We are grateful for the generous support of Rockland Trust,” stated DeAnna Willis, Executive Director of Doolittle Home. “Their donation will help residents communicate and interact with families living far away who may not have been able to physically visit.”

Today, Jeanne Travers, Marketing, Rockland Trust Charitable Foundation and Mark Coletta, Foxboro’s Assistant Vice President personally toured Doolittle Home. ” It’s wonderful that residents will be able to speak with grand kids and family who live far away. When I got married, my grandma was able to be a part of the wedding through my ipad and the Skype application. Now residents of Doolittle Home will be able to do this too.” Mark said.

About Rockland Trust Company

Rockland Trust Company is the sole bank subsidiary of Independent Bank Corp. (Nasdaq: INDB), with approximately $3.4 billion in assets. Rockland Trust offers commercial banking, retail banking, investment management services, and insurance sales services from 61 retail branches, 9 commercial lending centers, and 5 mortgage origination offices located throughout southeastern Massachusetts and on Cape Cod; and, from 4 investment management offices located throughout southeastern Massachusetts, on Cape Cod, and in Rhode Island. With 870 professionals, they are one of the largest employers in Southeastern Massachusetts and Cape Cod. Rockland Trust lives by four key promises:  a commitment to providing superior customer service, strengthening the communities in which it works and lives, investing in their employees’ success, and meeting shareholders’ expectations. To find out more about the products and services available at Rockland Trust, please visit https://www.rocklandtrust.com/.

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Save The Date For Doolittle Home’s Open House Event

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If you are considering options for your long-term care or that of your parents or loved ones, Doolittle Home cordially invites you to join us for an Open House event on Sunday, May 20th, from 2-4pm. We will serve refreshments, including our homemade “Foxboro Famous” Doolittle Home cookies, provide musical entertainment, and delightful giveaways.

With nearly a century of experience in caring for people, Doolittle Home offers a safe and dignified retirement choice. In a bed and breakfast atmosphere, with all the modern amenities, Doolittle Home provides 24/7 nursing care, a licensed nursing unit, onsite nutrition with a registered Dietician, Physical, Occupational, Speech therapies various activities and hairdressing services.  A small resident to staff ratio ensures that your loved ones receives the best care possible.

Doolittle Home is proud of its top-notch reputation and recently received a Deficiency Free Survey from the Massachusetts Board Of Public Health.  With increasingly stringent regulations, achieving the deficiency-free rating is exceedingly difficult. These surveys, and the subsequent ratings, are a useful tool for prospective and current residents; their families and health care practitioners, to make informed choices about the quality of a long term care facility.

 It takes an entire team effort to achieve this distinguished rating.  DeAnna Willis, Executive Director with the continuous efforts of the entire staff, including activities, maintenance, housekeeping, dietary, and professional medical staff, collaborate daily to provide extraordinary care, which is the hallmark of the Doolittle Experience.

At the Open House, meet with Doolittle Home’s caring, friendly staff, Board of Trustees, residents and tour this exceptionally special home. We look forward to meeting you, answering questions, and providing a personal guided journey. Experience first hand the Doolittle Difference.  Please feel free to call us 508-543-2694 and click here for a virtual tour.

 

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Laughter Yoga Comes To Doolittle Home

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Friday the 13th was not an unlucky day for Doolittle Home. Just the opposite. On April 13th, Certified Laughter Yoga Teacher, Linda Hamaker, brought laughter exercises, giant smiles, and high energy levels to the residents of Doolittle Home.

Laughter yoga encourages playfulness, deep belly laughs, social connection, and a balance of mind, body, and spirit. A fake laugh even has all the same health benefits as a real one, but turns into a real laugh when practiced in a group! It is called laughter yoga because it combines laughter exercises with yoga breathing. This brings more oxygen to the body and the brain which makes one feel more energetic and healthy. There are no fancy movements or joke-telling and any level of physical ability can do this as it can be done sitting or standing.

What happens in a Laughter Session?

A typical Laughter Yoga session is led by a laughter leader or teacher who controls the group, gives instructions for different laughter, breathing and stretching exercises. There are four steps of Laughter Yoga – clapping, breathing, childlike playfulness and laughter exercises.

It starts with warm up exercises like clapping, chanting ho ho ha ha followed by different laughter exercises where people are encouraged to laugh louder and heartily from the belly. These exercises are interspersed with deep breathing. We encourage participants to cultivate child like playfulness and eye contact which leads to real and spontaneous.

Five Benefits of Laughter Yoga

1. Personal Life: Laughter Yoga will help to add more laughter to your life, develop a sense of humor and a smile. You will feel more self confident, have a positive outlook, hope and optimism. It changes your mood within minutes and if your mood is good, everything seems good and you are at your best everywhere.

2. Business life: Your output and performance depends on your energy level. For optimal functioning of the brain, you need 25% more oxygen than any other body organs. Laughter Yoga increases the supply of oxygen, not only to the brain but to the entire body to help you work more than normal and efficiently.

3. Health Benefits: Laughter Yoga is a powerful cardio workout; in fact 10 minutes of hearty laughter is equal to 30 minutes on a rowing machine. It decreases the negative effects of stress on your body which is the root cause of all illnesses. Laughing Yoga is a single exercise that deals with physical, mental and emotional stress simultaneously. It also strengthens the immune system, lowers blood pressure, controls blood sugar and keeps your heart healthy. It is a powerful antidote against depression – the number one sickness today.

4. Social Life: The quality of life and life satisfaction does not depend on how much money, power, position and success you have; rather it depends on the number of good friends with whom one has a caring and sharing relationship. This appreciation and acknowledgment helps in emotional development. Laughter Yoga is a positive energy which quickly connects you with people and helps to make friends easily.

5. Inner Spirit of Laughter: Laughter Yoga will teach you how to keep your spirits high when you face challenges in life. It promotes a positive mental attitude to help you cope with negative situations and deal with difficult persons in a much better way than a normal person.

We are so excited to bring Laughter Yoga to Doolittle Home and look forward to many more years of laughing.

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If you would like a tour of Doolittle Home, please call 508.543.2694 and ask for DeAnna Willis. Click Here To Watch Video

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Save The Date- Doolittle Home To Exhibit At Senior Spectacular

Area seniors and older adults are invited to attend the 2012 Senior Spectacular Event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, April 20 at the at the North Attleboro Middle School, 564 Landry Avenue, North Attleboro, MA .

This annual event – hosted by state Rep. Betty Poirier, R-North Attleboro, and area senior providers – will showcase services for seniors. Last year the event drew more than 900 seniors and their families.

Senior Spectacular is free and includes specialized informational workshops, including an elder law panel about the five essential planning documents, health benefit workshop about medicare, medicare part D, etc, free health screenings, free continental breakfast and lunch,  raffles, exhibitors, giveaways, a fashion show and so much more. Providers of senior care will be on hand to distribute information, answer questions and share resources.

In addition a free continental breakfast and light lunch will be served. The day will conclude with a raffle and fashion show.

Registration is requested, with forms available at area senior centers, town halls, and libraries in Attleboro, Easton, Foxboro, Mansfield, Norton, North Attleboro Plainville, Raynham, Rehoboth, Seekonk, Taunton and Wrentham. Or  Click Here to download the Senior Spectacular pre-registration form.

Senior Spectacular motto is Live Well. Stay Informed. Presentations throughout the day and many other activities are offered to benefit the seniors of the Greater Attleboro Area, including Attleboro, Easton, Foxboro, Mansfield, Norton, North Attleboro, Plainville, Raynham, Rehoboth, Seekonk, Taunton and Wrentham.

Transportation for those in need is being coordinated by senior centers. Be sure and indicate your need for transportation on the registration form.

Questions: Contact, Diana Amaral, legislative aide to Poirier, at 617-722-2100.

Stop by the Doolittle Home booth for information, a virtual tour and giveaways.

If you would like a tour of Doolittle Home, please call 508.543.2694 and ask for DeAnna Willis. Click here to view Doolittle Home’s virtual tour.

 

 

 

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Communicating With Seniors

Language & Limitations Can Get In The Way

Communication can be very simple. Someone says something, and another person understands what they said…and meant. Of course, not all communication goes so smoothly. Things can get in the way.

For seniors, there may be numerous obstacles to overcome. If they have hearing or sight problems, getting a message through can be more difficult for everyone involved. Chronic pain, symptoms of illnesses and side effects from medications can dull a senior’s senses,
along with their ability to comprehend. In addition, generational differences can create a language barrier. Slang, references from pop culture and technical jargon can be very confusing.

In all these cases, conversing will demand more concentration and energy. If either of these are in short supply, communication will suffer even more. This can lead to everyone being frustrated and the natural tendency to avoid communication.

Here are some helpful tips for enhancing the flow of communication with seniors.

1-Seek the medical and dental help that can improve their hearing, sight and speech.
2-Ask questions that generate involvement and  check for their level of understanding.
3- Have the patience to wait for answers.
4-Make it easier for everyone to stay attentive. Cut down on noise and distractions. Make
sure the temperature, lighting and seating are as comfortable as possible.
5- Speak at a pace and volume that works for the senior. Use visual cues and physical touch to help convey your message.
6-Save important conversations for the time of day when their energy and concentration levels are the highest.

Sometimes seniors are not ready or willing to open up. Here are some hints for getting past their barriers and stimulating conversation.

1-Ask for their advice…and refrain from give yours.
2-Ask specific questions, yet don’t interrogate. Routine questions, such as “How are you
doing?”, usually lead to automatic answers.
3-Be a good listener and maintain eye contact. These are two ways you can communicate
that you care.
4-Listen for what they are not saying. This is especially important when dealing with the
effects of illnesses and disabilities.
5- For topics that are difficult for them to talk about, offer newspaper articles that will stimulate conversation or be seen as an authoritative point of view.

More and more seniors have adopted cell phones, voice mail  e-mail and even Skype, which is live video chat via the internet. For those who do not feel comfortable with the new technologies,  you will need to communicate on their terms, at their own pace, with patience and kindness.

 

Doolittle Home in Foxboro is unlike many retirement facilities and nursing homes these days. Doolittle Home is privately and independently managed by a volunteer board of local officers and trustees. Doolittle Home received the highest rating in Massachusetts for personal care provided to residents. One resident’s daughter said “I have such peace of mind knowing that Mother is where she needs to be and is being cared for by such caring people.” For Doolittle Home’s virtual tour click here and to read about the friends of Doolittle Home click here.

Below is a new video from Pat about her experience with Doolittle Home. Click on the video to watch.

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Chew On This

Dry mouth (xerostomia) is a common complaint for patients who take multiple medications. Saliva is the body’s defense again cavities. Naturally occurring bacteria that live in your mouth produce acids that cause tooth decay. Saliva acts to neutralize these acids. Chewing sugar free gum helps to increase the flow of saliva in your mouth and help prevent tooth decay!

Dentures

Patients that wear dentures often struggle keeping them secure in their mouths. The use of denture adhesives such as Polygrip should be a last resort. So why do dentures start to get loose.

Here’s the reason………

Your dentures, especially your upper denture uses a phenomenon called cohesion to stay attached to your gums. For example, if you take 2 identical plastic cups, add a little water and stack one inside the other and shake to disperse the water, you will find it virtually impossible to take them apart. That’s cohesion.  Similarly, upper dentures, newly made are so closely fitted to the gums that if you add a little saliva between them, they will “stick” in place. If your upper dentures feel loose or simple fall out of your mouth it’s because the side of your denture that touches your gums no longer fits well. With time and changes to your overall diet, the gums can shrink with weight loss or fill out with weight gain causing the dentures to feel loose. Consider a reline. This is the process where the inside of the dentures are stripped and a brand new lining is placed that fits perfectly against the gums.

The same is not the case for the lower set. Because you have a tongue in the middle, the lower dentures rest on much less of the gums. Since the tongue is always moving, it is difficult to keep the lower dentures in place. Under these circumstances, a relatively new option is to place 2 titanium implants into the lower jaw and attach them to the denture with 2 “buttons”. The results have been remarkable!

Article  written by Dr. Victor Leung. Dr. Leung of Foxboro Dental Associates is located at 132 Central Street in Foxboro, MA. For more details you can call 508.543.7901 and visit their website www.FoxboroDental.com

Interested in sharing your expertise? Become a guest blogger. Call Allison at 508-543-2694 for details.

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New Friend of Doolittle Home

“What I like about Doolittle Home is a sense of service and great staff.” says Dr. Victor Leung, D.M.D., who graciously volunteers his time tending to the residents oral health care. “When I come to Doolittle Home, everything is set up for me to serve the residents quickly, efficiently, and meet their needs in a familiar setting. ”

To read more about Dr. Leung and Friends of Doolittle Home click here

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Caregiver Tip # 2

“The edge of the bed sagged,  so she literally slid off the bed and broke her wrist.” Marge Howard, Doolittle Home’s Physical Therapist shares.

Most are unaware of the fact that beds need to be at a proper height. If someone is sitting on the edge of the bed, their feet should be firmly planted on the floor with their knees at or close to 90 degrees. Also the mattress edge should be firm enough so when they are sitting on the edge, the mattress is not sagging and acting as a slide, ensuring they don’t slide off the edge of the bed onto the floor.

An additional caregiver tip is to mindful of bed clothes, for example, satin and silk pajamas or sheets because of their slippery nature. “This is a frequent issue, especially with the women who have silky bathrobes and nightgowns.”

A family member is encouraged to install a bed transfer handle to help a person come to a sitting position or steady themselves on the edge of the bed. A bed transfer also can prevent falls without being too obtrusive. A bed transfer is described as a U shaped handle stuck between the bed board.

A full bed rail can prove to be hazardous than the transfer handle because a mildly confused or sleepy person is more apt to climb over the bed rail, while the transfer handle they are more apt to use it for an assist.

Marge Howard is the physical therapist consultant for Doolittle Home for 18 years. Watch Marge’s Video Here

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Sixteen Everyday Challenges Elderly Deal With

Those who have parents still living on their own may be interested in the following information. It is a list of the main problems confronting people over 55 years of age, according to a Gallup poll of 1,500 people in that category.

 

Below are the top 16 challenges the elderly can face on any given day.
1. Opening medicine packages
2. Reading product labels
3. Reaching high things
4. Fastening buttons, snaps and zippers
5. Vacuuming and dusting
6. Going up and down stairs
7. Cleaning bathtubs and sinks
8. Washing and waxing floors
9. Putting clothes over one’s head
10. Putting on socks, shoes, or stockings
11. Carrying purchases home
12. Using tools
13. Being helpless if something happens while at home alone
14. Using the shower or bathtub (where many falls occur)
15. Tying shoelaces, neckties and bows
16. Moving around the house without slipping or falling.

And for those living in colder climates, shoveling snow and dealing with winter conditions can create a challenge as well.

Although it is certainly not true that all elderly people have these problems, caregivers might want to keep this information in mind…especially when you consider that one common characteristic associated with aging is denial. Those that took care of us all of our lives may not want to admit it when they need help. Helping to reduce the difficulties associated with aging can assist in minimizing its most common negative emotions of fear, loneliness, depression and feelings of helplessness – and increase the feeling of vitality. Exercise and staying active can help keep these problems from occurring.

Many times one of the most difficult challenge for caregivers is to find ways to assist that don’t highlight the elderly loved one’s need for help.

Would you like more information about Doolittle Home? Click here for a 360 degree virtual tour or Call 508-543-2694 for a complimentary tour.

Subscribe to Doolittle Home’s Blog by clicking on the chair below. And feel free to leave comments in the comment box below and share Doolittle Home’s blog posts by clicking on the social media icons in the sharing is caring section. We’d  love to hear your input.

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A Message From DeAnna Willis

For nearly a century, Doolittle Home takes pride in providing exceptional care & peace of mind for residents and their families. Often described as a bed & breakfast setting with extraordinary nursing care focused on personal attention, watch Doolittle Home’s Executive Director speak about what makes our “home” special.

 

Click Here To Learn More About DeAnna And Doolittle Home’s Staff

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Looking For Great Gift Ideas For Seniors?

Choosing a gift for your older loved ones…what a great feeling to find the perfect gift! However, there are times when the perfect gift idea eludes you. If that happens, we would like to help. Here is a list of gift suggestions for seniors. Of course. choosing the appropriate gift will depend on the health, energy and living arrangements of your loved one.

Gift Certificates
Craft Stores
Groceries
Hair Salon
House Cleaning
Manicures-Pedicures
Restaurants
Massage
Movie Theaters

Clothes
Cardigans with large buttons
Dresses that open down the front
Pajamas, warm robes and fleece nightgowns
Shawls
Slippers and socks
Sweat suits with zippers
Craft Stores
Groceries
Hair Salon
House Cleaning
Manicures-Pedicures
Restaurants
Massage
Movie Theaters

Clothes
Cardigans with large buttons
Dresses that open down the front
Pajamas, warm robes and fleece nightgowns
Shawls
Slippers and socks
Sweat suits with zippers

Subscriptions
Readers Digest (large print)
Special interest magazines

Gift Baskets
filled with  their favorite goodies.

Pictures
Grandma/Grandpa album of fond memories
Framed family photos

Games
Crossword Puzzle
Deck of cards
Puzzles

Miscellaneous
Flowers and plants
Internet Service
The Roomba-Robotic vacuum cleaner
Computer Classes
Cell Phone with large buttons and volume control (such as the jitterbug)
Stationary
Telephone with large buttons and volume control
Transportation tickets
Senior oriented video games such as wii exercise for seniors. The Wii is becoming more and more popular with seniors. Seniors are using it to keep fit – both physically and mentally.
Old radio shows on tape (DVD)
Favorite old movies
Books on tape
Motion activated night light
Personalized coffee mugs
Electronic grocery list reminder
Donation to favorite charity on behalf of recipient

Senior loved ones often treasure gifts of your time and companionship.
Again, be aware of health, energy and living arrangements. Short (and frequent) visits may be preferred to long visits. If you cannot visit as often as you would like, you can contact churches, religious affiliations, and other organizations who visit seniors as a community service. They are happy to help.

Interested in a tour of Doolittle Home? Call 508.543.2694 and ask for DeAnna Willis, Executive Director.

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Caregiver Tip #1

Stan with Roz, Doolittle Home's Activities Director

In general, laughter makes people feel better. When providing care for residents at Doolittle Home,  finding humor can also help to relieve tension or embarrassment for our residents and staff. So we always search for reasons to smile. Even the slightest grin can improve anyone’s day, and it’s usually contagious to those around us…especially to Resident Stan.

Do you have a caregiver tip you’d like to share? Email us. We’d love to hear from you.

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Welcome To Doolittle Home’s Blog

Thank you for visiting Doolittle Home’s blog. Here we aim to share and connect with you about Doolittle Home news, elder care insights, and other pertinent information surrounding the care of an aging family member.

If you would like to visit Doolittle Home’s website click here

Doolittle Home is also on twitter, facebook, you tube, and linked in. Please keep in mind you will need accounts on these sites (other than you tube) to connect. We look forward to serving you.

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